Segu

Couverture
Penguin Group USA, 1996 - 493 pages
18 Avis
The year is 1797, and the kingdom of Segu is flourishing, fed by the wealth of its noblemen and the power of its warriors. The people of Segu, the Bambara, are guided by their griots and priests; their lives are ruled by the elements. But even their soothsayers can only hint at the changes to come, for the battle of the soul of Africa has begun. From the east comes a new religion, Islam, and from the West, the slave trade.

Segufollows the life of Dousika Traore, the king’s most trusted advisor, and his four sons, whose fates embody the forces tearing at the fabric of the nation. There is Tiekoro, who renounces his people’s religion and embraces Islam; Siga, who defends tradition, but becomes a merchant; Naba, who is kidnapped by slave traders; and Malobali, who becomes a mercenary and halfhearted Christian.

Based on actual events,Segutransports the reader to a fascinating time in history, capturing the earthy spirituality, religious fervor, and violent nature of a people and a growing nation trying to cope with jihads, national rivalries, racism, amid the vagaries of commerce.

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Review: Segu

Avis d'utilisateur  - Clarisse - Goodreads

My first introduction to Maryse Conde. Spellbinding story that captivated my imagination and turned me into a true admirer of hers. Consulter l'avis complet

Review: Segu

Avis d'utilisateur  - Czarny Pies - Goodreads

This is a wonderful family epic covering three centuries beginning in the early days of the trans-Atlantic slave trade in the 17th century and ending with the conquest of West Africa by the French in ... Consulter l'avis complet

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À propos de l'auteur (1996)

A native of Guadeloupe, Maryse Condé lived for many years in Paris, where she taught West Indian literature at the Sorbonne. The author of several novels that have been well received in France (both Segu and its sequel were best-sellers), she has lectured widely in the United States and now divides her time between Guadeloupe and New York city, where she teaches at Columbia University.

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