The Masters

Couverture
House of Stratus, 8 déc. 2000 - 358 pages
18 Avis

The fourth in the Strangers and Brothers series begins with the dying Master of a Cambridge college. His imminent demise causes intense rivalry and jealousy amongst the other fellows. Former friends become enemies as the election looms.

  

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Avis des utilisateurs

5 étoiles
2
4 étoiles
9
3 étoiles
2
2 étoiles
3
1 étoile
2

LibraryThing Review

Avis d'utilisateur  - Eyejaybee - LibraryThing

This is one of my favourite novels ... ever! Having briefly served as a Fellow of an Oxford College I have always enjoyed reading novels set in academia. My own short-lived Fellowship, at Oriel ... Consulter l'avis complet

Review: The Masters (Strangers and Brothers #5)

Avis d'utilisateur  - Stephen - Goodreads

Slow in unwinding, not particularly well-styled but absorbing if you like groves of academe/government settings. Like Trollope's Barchester novels, but without the humor and vividness and caricaturing ... Consulter l'avis complet

Pages sélectionnées

Table des matières

News after a Medical Examination
3
The Master Talks of the Future
10
A Small Party in the Combination Room
17
A Piece of Serious Business
26
Success and Envy
35
Streets in the Thaw
45
Decision to Call on Jago
49
Three Kinds of Power
54
An Observers Smile
181
Stalemate
184
Conference of Six
192
Clowning and Pride
201
A Vacancy in the Office of Master
206
Jago Thinks of Himself as a Young Man
215
A Good Day for the College
221
The Virtues of the Other Side
231

Quarrel with a Friend
61
First College Meeting of Term
72
View from Roy Calverts Window
81
Jago Walks Round the Court
88
WAITING
101
Progress of an Illness
103
Commemoration of Benefactors
111
Negotiations After a Feast
118
An Hour of Pride
127
Were All Alone
132
Result of an Anxiety
135
A Nice Little Party
141
The Depth of Ambition
148
Propaganda
154
The Scent of Acacia
160
Affliction
167
Argument in the Summer Twilight
174
That Which Dies Last
235
Obligations of Love
243
Crawford Behaves Sensibly
252
Visit to an Authority
258
Six Nights to Go
266
A Cave is Formed
272
MORNING IN THE CHAPEL
277
A Group Talks Till the Morning
279
I Have Had a Disappointing Life
285
Two Cigars in the Combination Room
292
The Last Night
297
Each is Alone
305
Deeper Than Shame
312
The Election
318
The Master Presides
326
REFLECTIONS ON THE COLLEGE PAST
331
Droits d'auteur

Expressions et termes fréquents

À propos de l'auteur (2000)

C.P. Snow was born in Leicester, on 15 October 1905. He was educated from age 11 at Alderman Newton's School for boys where he excelled in most subjects, enjoying a reputation for an astounding memory. In 1923, he gained an external scholarship in science at London University, whilst working as a laboratory assistant at Newton's to gain the necessary practical experience, because Leicester University, as it was to become, had no chemistry or physics departments at that time.

Having achieved a first class degree, followed by a Master of Science he won a studentship in 1928 which he used to research at the famous Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge. Snow went on to become a Fellow of Christ's College, Cambridge, in 1930 where he also served as a tutor, but his position became increasingly titular as he branched into other areas of activity.  In 1934, he began to publish scientific articles in 'Nature', and then 'The Spectator' before becoming editor of the journal 'Discovery' in 1937.

He was also writing fiction during this period and in 1940 'Strangers and Brothers' was published. This was the first of eleven novels in the series and was later renamed 'George Passant' when 'Strangers and Brothers' was used to denote the series itself. 'Discovery' became a casualty of the war, closing in 1940. However, by this time Snow was already involved with the Royal Society, who had organised a group to specifically use British scientific talent operating under the auspices of the Ministry of Labour. He served as the Ministry's technical director from 1940 to 1944.

After the war, he became a civil service commissioner responsible for recruiting scientists to work for the government and also returned to writing, continuing the 'Strangers and Brothers' novels.  'The Light and the Dark' was published in 1947, followed by 'Time of Hope' in 1949, and perhaps the most famous and popular of them all, 'The Masters', in 1951. He planned to finish the cycle within five years, but the final novel 'Last Things' wasn't published until 1970.

C.P. Snow married the novelist Pamela Hansford Johnson in 1950 and they had one son, Philip, in 1952.  He was knighted in 1957 and became a life peer in 1964, taking the title Baron Snow of the City Leicester.  He also joined Harold Wilson's first government as Parliamentary Secretary to the new Minister of Technology. When the department ceased to exist in 1966 he became a vociferous back-bencher in the House of Lords.

After finishing the 'Strangers and Brothers' series, Snow continued writing both fiction and non-fiction. His last work of fiction was 'A Coat of Vanish', published in 1978. His non-fiction included a short life of Trollope published in 1974 and another, published posthumously in 1981, 'The Physicists: a Generation that Changed the World'. He was also inundated with lecturing requests and offers of honorary doctorates. In 1961, he became Rector of St. Andrews University and for ten years also wrote influential weekly reviews for the 'Financial Times'.

Informations bibliographiques