The New Men

Couverture
House of Stratus, 8 déc. 2000 - 290 pages
3 Avis

It is the onset of World War II in the fifth in the Strangers and Brothers series. A group of Cambridge scientists are working on atomic fission. But there are consequences for the men who are affected by it. Hiroshima also causes mixed personal reactions.

  

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LibraryThing Review

Avis d'utilisateur  - otterley - LibraryThing

Another re read. CP Snow is so very unfashionable these days, having been very much feted and celebrated at the time, that it is interesting to think why. He is one of very few serious writers who ... Consulter l'avis complet

Review: The New Men (Strangers and Brothers #6)

Avis d'utilisateur  - Denise Harris - Goodreads

Not my favourite of the series. Last read for A level,many moons ago. Consulter l'avis complet

Table des matières

Argument with a Brother
3
A Code Name
12
What Might Have Been Foresight
17
Result of a Manoeuvre
20
Advice from a Man in Trouble
26
Morning Before the Office
33
Voice from a Bath
42
Part Two The exPerimenT
47
What Is Important?
150
Standard Roses in the Sunshine
155
Need for a Brother
165
Part Four A resUlT in PriVATe
173
An Uneffaceable Afternoon
175
What Do You Expect from Him Now?
181
Hushed Voices Under the Beams
188
A Joyous Moment in the Fog
195

Gambling by a Cautious Man
49
View of a True Marriage
55
A Night at Pratts
60
Two Kinds of Danger
65
A Routine Interview
69
Beside the Smooth Water
74
Unexpected Encouragement
79
SisterinLaw
84
Points on a Graph
88
Quarrel at First Light
98
Part Three A resUlT in PUbliC
107
Request for an Official Opinion
109
A New Whisper
113
The Taste of Triumph
120
Beam of Light over the Snow
126
Swearing in a Hospital Ward
133
Events Too Big for Men
143
Situation Designed for a Clear Head
199
Distress Out of Proportion
206
Wife and Husband
209
Warm to the Touch
216
The Brilliance of Suspicion
223
A Cartoonlike Resemblance
228
The Lonely Men
232
Words in the Open
240
Part Five Two broThers
249
Technique Behind a High Reward
251
Visit to a Prisoner
256
Lights Twinkling in the Cold
260
A Place to Stand?
268
A New Empire
274
Two Brothers
278
Droits d'auteur

Expressions et termes fréquents

À propos de l'auteur (2000)

C.P. Snow was born in Leicester, on 15 October 1905. He was educated from age 11 at Alderman Newton's School for boys where he excelled in most subjects, enjoying a reputation for an astounding memory. In 1923, he gained an external scholarship in science at London University, whilst working as a laboratory assistant at Newton's to gain the necessary practical experience, because Leicester University, as it was to become, had no chemistry or physics departments at that time.

Having achieved a first class degree, followed by a Master of Science he won a studentship in 1928 which he used to research at the famous Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge. Snow went on to become a Fellow of Christ's College, Cambridge, in 1930 where he also served as a tutor, but his position became increasingly titular as he branched into other areas of activity.  In 1934, he began to publish scientific articles in 'Nature', and then 'The Spectator' before becoming editor of the journal 'Discovery' in 1937.

He was also writing fiction during this period and in 1940 'Strangers and Brothers' was published. This was the first of eleven novels in the series and was later renamed 'George Passant' when 'Strangers and Brothers' was used to denote the series itself. 'Discovery' became a casualty of the war, closing in 1940. However, by this time Snow was already involved with the Royal Society, who had organised a group to specifically use British scientific talent operating under the auspices of the Ministry of Labour. He served as the Ministry's technical director from 1940 to 1944.

After the war, he became a civil service commissioner responsible for recruiting scientists to work for the government and also returned to writing, continuing the 'Strangers and Brothers' novels.  'The Light and the Dark' was published in 1947, followed by 'Time of Hope' in 1949, and perhaps the most famous and popular of them all, 'The Masters', in 1951. He planned to finish the cycle within five years, but the final novel 'Last Things' wasn't published until 1970.

C.P. Snow married the novelist Pamela Hansford Johnson in 1950 and they had one son, Philip, in 1952.  He was knighted in 1957 and became a life peer in 1964, taking the title Baron Snow of the City Leicester.  He also joined Harold Wilson's first government as Parliamentary Secretary to the new Minister of Technology. When the department ceased to exist in 1966 he became a vociferous back-bencher in the House of Lords.

After finishing the 'Strangers and Brothers' series, Snow continued writing both fiction and non-fiction. His last work of fiction was 'A Coat of Vanish', published in 1978. His non-fiction included a short life of Trollope published in 1974 and another, published posthumously in 1981, 'The Physicists: a Generation that Changed the World'. He was also inundated with lecturing requests and offers of honorary doctorates. In 1961, he became Rector of St. Andrews University and for ten years also wrote influential weekly reviews for the 'Financial Times'.

Informations bibliographiques