Writings on Art

Couverture
Yale University Press, 2006 - 172 pages
1 Commentaire
While the collected writings of many major 20th-century artists, including Barnett Newman, Robert Motherwell, and Ad Reinhardt, have been published, Mark Rothko’s writings have only recently come to light, beginning with the critically acclaimed The Artist’s Reality: Philosophies of Art. Rothko’s other written works have yet to be brought together into a major publication. Writings on Art fills this significant void; it includes some 90 documents—including short essays, letters, statements, and lectures—written by Rothko over the course of his career. The texts are fully annotated, and a chronology of the artist’s life and work is also included.
This provocative compilation of both published and unpublished writings from 1934--69 reveals a number of things about Rothko: the importance of writing for an artist who many believed had renounced the written word; the meaning of transmission and transition that he experienced as an art teacher at the Brooklyn Jewish Center Academy; his deep concern for meditation and spirituality; and his private relationships with contemporary artists (including Newman, Motherwell, and Clyfford Still) as well as journalists and curators.
As was revealed in Rothko’s The Artist’s Reality, what emerges from this collection is a more detailed picture of a sophisticated, deeply knowledgeable, and philosophical artist who was also a passionate and articulate writer.
  

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Writings on art

Avis d'utilisateur  - Not Available - Book Verdict

Rothko's multiform and abstract expressionist paintings make him one of the most important artists of the 20th century. Gathering all of the artist's writings held in public collections as well as ... Consulter l'avis complet

Review: Writings on Art

Avis d'utilisateur  - Misty - Goodreads

very inspirational stuff. every pre-school teacher should read this. Consulter l'avis complet

Table des matières

New Training for Future Artists and Art Lovers 1934
1
Scribble Book ca 1934
4
Whitney Dissenters 1938
16
is A comparative analysis ca 1941 f 22 The ideal teacher ca 1941
22
Indigenousness ca 1941
25
The satisfaction of the creative impulse ca 1941 M
28
so Manuscript drafts of a letter to the editor by Rothko and Adolph Gottlieb
30
1943
32
Letter to Katharine Kuh July 14 1954
90
Letter to Katharine Kuh ca August 1954
94
Letter to Petronel Lukens August 1954
95
Letter to Petronel Lukens September 1954
96
Letter to Katharine Kuh September 20 1954
98
Letter to Katharine Kuh October 20 1954
102
Letter to Katharine Kuh November 1954
104
ios Letter to Katharine Kuh December 1954
105

as Rothko and Gottliebs letter to the editor 1943
35
The Portrait and the Modern Artist by Rothko and Adolph Gottlieb 1943
37
Comments on The Omen of the Eagle 1943
41
Brief autobiography ca 1945
42
4i Letter to Emily Genauer 1945
43
I adhere to the reality of things 1945
44
Personal statement 1945
45
ae Letter to the editor 1945
46
Letter to Barnett Newman 1945
47
Clyfford Still 1946
48
Letter to Barnett Newman June 1946
49
so Letter to Barnett Newman August 1946
50
Letter to Barnett Newman 1947
52
Letter to Herbert Ferber 1947
53
The Attitudes of Ten Artists on Their Art and Contemporaneousness 1947
57
ss The romantics were prompted 1947
58
so Letter to Clay Spohn February 1948
60
Letter to Clay Spohn May 1948
62
Letter to Clay Spohn 1949
64
es Statement on His Attitude in Painting 1949
65
Letter to Barnett Newman April 1950
66
Letter to Barnett Newman June 1950
68
6 Letter to Barnett Newman July 1950
69
TO Letter to Barnett Newman August 7 1950
70
How to Combine Architecture Painting and Sculpture 1951
74
Notes from an interview by William Seitz 1952
75
so Letter to Herbert Ferber August 1952
80
Letter to Herbert Ferber September 1952
82
Letter to Lloyd Goodrich 1952
83
as Notes from an interview by William Seitz March 1953
85
Notes from an interview by William Seitz April 1953
86
Letter to Katharine Kuh May 1954
89
Letter to Petronel Lukens December 1954
107
ios Letter to Katharine Kuh ca 1954
108
Whenever one begins to speculate ca 1954
109
Relation to ones own past ca 1954
111
Space in painting ca 1954
112
Letter to Katharine Kuh 1955
113
Letter to Herbert Ferber July 7 1955
116
Letter to Lawrence Calcagno 1956
118
11 Notes from a conversation with Selden Rodman 1956
119
in Letter to Herbert Ferber 1957
121
us Letter to Rosalind Irvine 1957
123
Letter to the editor 1957
124
us Address to Pratt Institute 1958
125
Letter to Ida Kohlmeyer ca 1958
129
Mark Rothko Portrait of the Artist as an Angry Man 1970
130
Letter to Herbert Ferber and Bernard Reis 1959
139
Letter to Elise Asher and Stanley Kunitz 1959
141
Letter to Milton Avery 1960
142
Notecards ca 19501960
143
Letter to the Whitechapel Gallery 1961
145
A Talk with Mark Rothko 1961
147
Letter to Herbert Ferber 1962
148
Tribute to Milton Avery 1965
149
Letter to Bernard Reis 1966
151
Letter to Norman Reid 1966
152
Letter to Herbert Ferber July 7 1967
155
Letter to Elise Asher and Stanley Kunitz 1967
156
Acceptance of Yale University honorary doctorate 1969
157
CHRONOLOGY
159
INDEX
169
Droits d'auteur

Expressions et termes fréquents

Références à ce livre

À propos de l'auteur (2006)

Mark Rothko was born in Russia and came to the United States with his family in 1913. A major figure in New York’s Abstract Expressionist movement, he has been the subject of retrospectives at the Museum of Modern Art, the National Gallery of Art, Washington, the Guggenheim Museum, and other major museums around the world. Miguel López-Remiro is associate director at the Guggenheim Bilbao Museum.

Informations bibliographiques