Piers Plowman

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University of California Press, 1978 - 416 pages
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Table des matières

Preface
1
Abbreviations
3
Bibliography
5
Introduction
9
Piers Plowman
25
Prologue The Fair Field Full of Folk
27
Holy Church
42
The Marriage of Lady Meed
54
This aren euidences quod Hunger for hem bat wolle nat swynke
215
the Mirror of MiddleEarth
223
Imaginatif
234
The Feast of Patience and the Meeting with Activa Vita
246
Patience and Liberum Arbitrium
261
To beggares and to boys bat loth ben to worche
265
3e han manged ouermoche bat maketh 3ow to be syke
275
Liberum Arbitrium on Charity and the Church
278

Lady Meed at Westminster
66
The Fall of Lady Meed
88
The Authors Apologia and the Sermon of Reason
97
The Confession of the Sins
109
The Shriving of the Folk Piers Plowmans Guide to Truth
129
The Ploughing of the HalfAcre
146
The Pardon sent from Truth
161
the Discourse of the Friars Thought and Wit
178
the Discourse of Study Clergy and Rechelesnesse
194
Discourse of Rechelesnesse on Humility and Patient Poverty
210
in Abrahames lappe i e in Limbo with prospects of heaven under the protection
282
The Tree of Charity and the Meeting with Faith
293
Hope and the Good Samaritan
306
The Crucifixion and the Harrowing of Hell
319
The Founding of Holy Church
342
The Coming of Antichrist
362
Alphabetical ReferenceList
377
Glossary
386
Droits d'auteur

Expressions et termes fréquents

À propos de l'auteur (1978)

William Langland is the name generally attributed to the author of Piers Plowman, a classic Middle English poem. Written in an unrhymed, alliterative style that was traditional at the time, the poem is composed of a series of dream visions in which the dreamer grapples with issues such as the nature of Christ's love and the relationship between people and God. Piers Plowman is considered to be one of the greatest religious poems in the English language, and Langland ranks among the best of the Middle English authors, along with Geoffrey Chaucer and the anonymous author of Sir Gawain and the Green Knight. Langland is believed to have lived from about 1331 to 1400. Based on the poem, which is thought to be partly autobiographical, Langland probably spent his early years in the Malvern and later lived in London. Some scholars believe that Langland was a poor cleric in one of the minor religious orders; others suggest that he was a monk. Whichever is true, it is evident from his work that he was well-educated, a gifted poet, and very knowledgeable about both the political and the ecclesiastical controversies of his time. It is not certain whether any more of Langland's work has survived. Piers the Plowman's Creed and Richard Redeless, two shorter poems that were previously attributed to Langland, are now believed to have been written by others.

Derek Pearsall is the Gurney Professor of English at Harvard University and was Professor and Co-Director of the Centre for Medieval Studies at the University of York, 1965-85.

Duncan Wu is a Fellow of St Catherine's College, Oxford, and University Lecturer in English Literature.

Informations bibliographiques