The spirit of laws. Transl. 1st Amer. ed (Livre numérique Google)

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1802
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Of the principle of democracy ibid 4 Of the principle of aristocracy
39
That virtue is not the principle of a monarchical government
40
In what manner virtue is supplied in a monarchical government
41
That honor is not the principle of despotic government ibid 9 Of the principle of despotic government
42
Difference of obedience in moderate and despotic governments
44
lhat theLaivs of Education ought 10 be relative to the Principles of Government 1 Of the laws of education
46
Of education in monarchies
47
Of education in a despotic government
50
Difserence between the effects of ancient and modem education
51
Of some institutions among the Greeks rs 7 In what case these singular institutions may be of service
54
Explication of a paradox of the ancients in respect to manners
55
BOOK V That the Lavas given by the Legislators ought to be relative to the Principle of Government 1 Idea of this book
58
What is meant by a love of the republic in a democracy
59
to Of the expedition peculiar to the executive power in monarchies
74
The same subject continued
83
1 Of the simplicity of civil laws in difserent governments
92
t7 Of the question or torture
114
Of the corruption ot the principle of despotic government
143
Distinctive properties of a republic ibij
149
Of the relative force of states
161
a Of war ibid 3 Of the right of conquest
165
Gelon king of Syracuse lfiy 6 Of conquests made by a republic ibid
167
4 In what manner the love of equality and frugality is inspired fco 5
168
The same subject continued
169
Of one monarchy that subdues another
170
Of the mannets of a conquered people
171
Of a lav of Cyrus ibid 13 Alexander 172
172
Charles XII
174
New methods of preserving a conquest
175
Of conquests made by a deipotic prince
176
Of theLaws that form Political Liberty ivitb regard to the Constitution 1 A general idea
177
Different significations given to the word liberty
178
In what liberty consists 10
192
g Aristotles manner of thinking
194
si Of the kings of the heroic times of Greece
195
In what manner the distribution of the three powers began to change aster the expulsion of the kings
199
In what manner Rome while in the flourishing state of the repub lic suddenly lost its liberty
201
Of the legislative powers in the Roman republic
203
Of the crime against nature
221
Of the Relation which the levying of Taxes
243
io That the greatness of taxes depends on the nature of the government
250
Of an exemption from taxes
257
S Of the disserence of men in difserent climates ibid 3 Contradiction in the characters of some southern nations
263
Cauie of the immutability of religion manners customs and laws in the eastern countries
264
Of the cultivation of warm climates
265
Of monachism
266
An excellent custom of China ibid 9 Means of encouraging industry 267
267
Of the laws relative to the sobriety of the people ibid ii Of the laws relative to the distempers of the climate
269
Of the laws against suicides
271
Effects arising from the climate of England ibid 14 Other efsects of the climate
273
Of the different confidence which the laws have in the people ac cording to the difference of climates
274
Of civil slavery
275
Origin of the right of slavery among the Roman civilians
276
Another origin of the right of slavery 27ft 4 Another origin of the right of slavery ibid
278
7
279
Of the slavery of the negroes tiaf 6 The true origin of the right of slavery
280
Another origin of the right of slavery
281
Inutility of slavery among us ibid 9 Several kinds of slavery
282
Regulations necessary in respect to slavery
283
Danger from the multitude of slaves
284
Of armed slaves gj
285
The fame subject continued
286
Precautions to be used in moderate governments
287
Regulations between masters and slaves
289
Of enfranchisements 2go 18 Of frcfdmen and eunuchs
292
How tbcLaws of Domestic Slavery have a Relation to the Nature of the Climate 1 Of domestic servitude
293
s That in the countries of the south there is a natural inequality be tween the two sexes
294
That a plurality of wives depends greatly 011 the means of support ing them
295
That the law of polygamy is an affair that depends on calculation
296
The reason of a law of Malabar
297
Of polygamy considered in itself ibid 7 Of an equality of treatment in case of many wives 29S 8 Of th separation of women from men
299
Hotu the Laws of Political Servitude have a
308
Of Laws in tbe Relation they bear to the Nature
316
Of savage nations and nations of barbarians
322
so Of the law of nations as practised by the Tartars
328
33 Of the ornaments of royalty
334

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Page 181 - When the legislative and executive powers are united in the same person, or in the same body of magistrates, there can be no liberty; because apprehensions may arise, lest the same monarch or senate should enact tyrannical laws, to execute them in a tyrannical manner.
Page 187 - ... have the means of examining in what manner its laws have been executed; an advantage which this government has over that of Crete and Sparta, where the cosmi and the ephori gave no account of their administration.
Page 191 - It is natural for mankind to set a higher value upon courage than timidity, on activity than prudence, on strength than counsel. Hence the army will ever despise a senate, and respect their own officers. They will naturally slight the orders sent them by a body of men whom they look upon as cowards, and therefore unworthy to command them.
Page 181 - Were it joined with the legislative, the life and liberty of the subject would be exposed to arbitrary control ; for the judge would then be the legislator. Were it joined to the executive power, the judge might behave with violence and oppression.
Page 183 - ... there is an end of liberty; unless they are taken up in order to answer without delay to a capital crime, in which case they are really free, being subject only to the power of the law.
Page 26 - As most citizens have sufficient ability to choose, though unqualified to be chosen, so the people, though capable of calling others to an account for their administration, are incapable of conducting the administration themselves. The public business must be carried on with a certain motion, neither too quick nor too slow. But the motion of the people is always either too remiss or too violent. Sometimes with a hundred thousand arms they overturn all before them; and sometimes with a hundred thousand...
Page 190 - To prevent the executive power from being able to oppress, it is requisite that the armies with which it is...
Page 182 - ... in quality of legislators. They may plunder the state by their general determinations ; and as they have likewise the judiciary power in their hands, every private citizen may be ruined by their particular decisions.
Page 186 - The executive power ought to be in the hands of a monarch, because this branch of government, having need of despatch, is better administered by one than by many: on the other hand, whatever depends on the legislative power is oftentimes better regulated by many than by a single person.
Page 279 - These creatures are all over black, and with such a flat nose that they can scarcely be pitied. It is hardly to be believed that God, who is a wise Being, should place a soul, especially a good soul, in such a black ugly body.

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