In the Vineyard of the Text: A Commentary to Hugh's Didascalicon

Couverture
University of Chicago Press, 15 juin 1996 - 162 pages
3 Avis
In a work with profound implications for the electronic age, Ivan Illich explores how revolutions in technology affect the way we read and understand text.

Examining the Didascalicon of Hugh of St. Victor, Illich celebrates the culture of the book from the twelfth century to the present. Hugh's work, at once an encyclopedia and guide to the art of reading, reveals a twelfth-century revolution as sweeping as that brought about by the invention of the printing press and equal in magnitude only to the changes of the computer age—the transition from reading as a vocal activity done in the monastery to reading as a predominantly silent activity performed by and for individuals.
  

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Review: In the Vineyard of the Text: A Commentary to Hugh's Didascalicon

Avis d'utilisateur  - Heather Bain - Goodreads

Excellent piece. Illich has had a profound effect on my philosophy of life. He was a prophet. Consulter l'avis complet

Review: In the Vineyard of the Text: A Commentary to Hugh's Didascalicon

Avis d'utilisateur  - Josh - Goodreads

This was a fascinating look at how the written word changed in the 12th century. It went from a "circle of mumblers" (monks) to a textual world, which we are not fully inhabiting. Consulter l'avis complet

Pages sélectionnées

Table des matières

Reading toward Wisdom
9
INCIPIT
10
STUDIUM
15
DISCIPLINA
17
SAPIENTIA
19
LUMEN
21
THE PAGE AS MIRROR
23
THE NEW SELF
25
THE LATIN MONOPOLY OVER LETTERS
72
Scholastic Reading
76
THE DUTY TO READ
77
IN SPITE OF SLENDER INCOME
78
THE CANON REGULAR EDIFIES BY HIS LECTIO
80
THE FLIPPING OF THE PAGE
83
THE NEW CLERIC MONOPOLIZES LETTERS
85
SILENT READING
88

AMICITIA
28
Order Memory and History
31
ORDO
32
ARTES
35
THE TREASURE CHEST IN THE READERS HEART
37
THE HISTORY OF MEMORY
40
THE LAWYERS SKILL AT THE SERVICE OF PRAYER
44
MEMORY TRAINING AS PRELUDE TO WISDOM
46
HISTORIA AS FOUNDATION
47
ALL CREATION IS PREGNANT
50
Monastic Reading
53
COMMUNITIES OF MUMBLERS
56
THE PAGE AS A VINEYARD AND GARDEN
59
LECTIO AS A WAY OF LIFE
60
OTIA MONASTICA
63
THE DEMISE OF THE LECTIO DIVINA
66
Lectio in Latin
68
GREGORIAN CHANT
70
THE SCHOLASTIC DICTATIO
93
From Recorded Speech to the Record of Thought
95
FROM THE TRACE OF UTTERANCE TO THE MIRROR OF CONCEPT
97
FROM THE COMMENT ON A STORY TO THE STORY ABOUT A SUBJECT
99
VISIBLE PATTERNS
101
INSTANT ACCESS
102
ALPHABETIC INDEXING
103
AUTHOR VERSUS COMPILER COMMENTATOR AND SCRIBE
107
LAYOUT
108
ILLUMINATIO VERSUS ILLUSTRATIO
109
THE PORTABLE BOOK
113
From Book to Text
117
TOWARD A HISTORY OF THE TEXT AS OBJECT
118
THE ABSTRACTION OF THE TEXT
121
LINGUA AND TEXTUS
123
Bibliography
127
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À propos de l'auteur (1996)

Born in Vienna in 1926, Ivan Illich grew up in Europe. He studied theology, philosophy, history, and natural science. During the 1950s he worked as a parish priest among Puerto Ricans in the Hell's Kitchen section of New York City and then served as rector of the Catholic University of Puerto Rico. During the 1960s he founded centers for cross-cultural communication, first in Puerto Rico and then in Cuernavaca, Mexico. Since the late 1970s, he has divided his time among Mexico, the United States, and Germany. He is also a professor of Science, Technology, and Society at Penn State University. Illich's radical anarchist views first became widely known through a set of four books published during the early 1970s---Deschooling Society (1971), Tools for Conviviality (1973), Energy and Equity (1974), and Medical Nemesis (1976). Tools is the most general statement of Illich's principles; the other three expand on examples sketched in Today in order to critique what he calls "radical monopolies" in the technologies of education, energy consumption, and medical treatment. This critique applies equally to both the so-called developed and the developing nations but in different ways. Two subsequent collections of occasional pieces---Toward a History of Needs (1978) and Shadow Work (1981)---stress the distorting influence on society and culture of the economics of scarcity, or the presumption that economies function to remedy scarcities rather than to share goods. Toward a History of Needs also initiates a project in the history or archaeology of ideas that takes its first full-bodied shape in Gender (1982), an attempt to recover social experiences of female-male complementarity that have been obscured by the modern economic regime. H2O and the Waters of Forgetfulness (1985) extends this project into a history of "stuff." ABC:The Alphabetization of the Popular Mind (1988) carries Illich's project forward into the area of literacy, as does his most recent book, In the Vineyard of the Text (1993). In the Mirror of the Past (1992) is a collection of occasional essays and talks from the 1980s, linking his concerns with economics, education, history, and the new ideological meaning of life. Illich himself is a polymath who speaks at least six languages fluently and who writes regularly in three of these (English, Spanish, and German); his books have been translated into more than 15 other languages.

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