Imaginary homelands: essays and criticism, 1981-1991

Couverture
Granta Books, 1991 - 432 pages
21 Avis
Like George Orwell or Bruce Chatwin, Salman Rushdie observes and illuminates a stunning range of cultural, political, and intellectual issues crucial to our time. Imaginery Homelands is an important record of Rushdie's intellectual and personal odyssey, and the 75 essays collected here, written over the last ten years, cover an astonishing range of subjects.

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Review: Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991

Avis d'utilisateur  - Ron - Goodreads

A fantastic collection of essays on literature, censorship, politics in India, and much more. Rushdie's defense of his novel "The Satanic Verses", titled "In Good Faith" is a very powerful piece of writing. His reviews of many works of literature is endlessly fascinating. Highly Recommended. Consulter l'avis complet

Review: Imaginary Homelands: Essays and Criticism 1981-1991

Avis d'utilisateur  - Rosa Jamali - Goodreads

These days I read quite a number of stuff written by my friends those who live abroad , mostly in LA and I see the main theme is struggling the American life. The texts appear in Persian yet you ... Consulter l'avis complet

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Table des matières

Introduction
1
Imaginary Homelands
9
in Midnights Children
22
Droits d'auteur

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À propos de l'auteur (1991)

Salman Rushdie was born in India, raised in Pakistan, and educated in England, where he now lives. His Rabelaisian skill for telling stories teeming with fantasy and history, and the virtuosity of his style, with its sly transliterations of Indo-English idioms, won him a delighted audience with the publication of Midnight's Children in 1980. However, it was the urgency with which he returned to the lands of his birth and childhood to write of a world where politics and the individual are inseparably connected that won him wide acclaim as a brilliant new novelist and intellectual. He manages to stand both inside and outside the world of developing nations and tell their stories. His fantastical retelling of the story of Islam set in a London peopled by immigrants from around the world, The Satanic Verses (1988), is his last full-length novel: its publication raised the anger of Muslims in Britain, South Asia, and the Middle East who asked that the novel be banned. In February 1989, Iran's Ayatollah Khomeini decreed a fatwa pronouncing the death sentence on him, and Rushdie has since lived in hiding. Subsequently, he offered several published explanations and apologies to Muslims (collected in Imaginary Homelands, 1991), and he also wrote a children's story, Haroun and the Sea of Stories (1990). In 2006, Rushdie joined the Emory University faculty as Distinguished Writer in Residence for one month a year for the next five years. Rushdie was awarded a knighthood for services to literature in the Queen's Birthday Honours on 16 June, 2007.

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