ARCHAEOLOGY AND THE MEDIA

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Left Coast Press, 2007 - 323 pages
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The public’s fascination with archaeology has meant that archaeologists have had to deal with media more regularly than other scholarly disciplines. How archaeologists communicate their research to the public through the media and how the media view archaeologists has become an important feature in the contemporary world of academic and professional archaeologists. In this volume, a group of archaeologists, many with media backgrounds, address the wide range of questions in this intersection of fields. An array of media forms are covered including television, film, photography, the popular press, art, video games, radio and digital media with a focus on the overriding question: What are the long-term implications of the increasing exposure through and reliance upon media forms for archaeology in the contemporary world? The volume will be of interest to archaeologists and those teaching public archaeology courses.
 

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Table des matières

List of Illustrations
7
Preface
9
Archaeology and the Media
11
Part I Archaeologys Reception of the Media
67
Part II Translating Archaeological Narratives
109
Part III Has the Media Changed Archaeology?
151
Part IV Visual Archaeology
185
Part V Archaeology the Media and the Digital Future
253
References
291
Index
313
About the Editors and Contributors
321
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À propos de l'auteur (2007)

Timothy Clack is about to submit his doctoral thesis to the School of Arts, Histories and Cultures, University of Manchester, UK entitled Soul Searching in Human Evolution. He teaches archaeological and anthropological theory/philosophy and has conducted extensive fieldwork in Kilimanjaro, Tanzania. In addition he is Senior Tutor at St. Anselm Hall with Canterbury Court.Marcus Brittain is a doctoral candidate soon to submit his thesis to the School of Arts, Histories and Cultures, University of Manchester, UK on various aspects of 'practice' in the Neolithic and Bronze Age of coastal Wales and the Cambridgeshire Fens.