Crime and Punishment: The Coulson Translation, Backgrounds and Sources, Essays in Criticism

Couverture
W.W. Norton, 1989 - 694 pages
3 Avis
Crime and Punishment (1866) is the story of a murder committed on principle, of a killer who wishes by his action to set himself outside and above society. A novel of great physical and psychological tension, pervaded by Dostoevsky's sinister evocation of St Petersburg, it also has moments of wild humour. Dostoevsky's own harrowing experiences mark the novel. He had himself undergone interrogation and trial, and was condemned to death, a sentence commuted at the last moment to penal servitude. In prison he was particularly impressed by one hardened murderer who seemed to have attained a spiritual equilibrium beyond good and evil: yet witnessing the misery of other convicts also engendered in Dostoevsky a belief in the Christian idea of salvation through suffering.

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Avis d'utilisateur  - datrappert - LibraryThing

This very focused and highly readable story of a murder and its aftermath is riveting, with some exceptional scenes along the way. There is also a great deal of philosophizing and injection of ... Consulter l'avis complet

LibraryThing Review

Avis d'utilisateur  - HvyMetalMG - LibraryThing

I read this in college. And it was the only book I ever read in about 3 days with no trouble - and I was an English major. I thought this is a masterful story of psychology and guilt. A precursor to ... Consulter l'avis complet

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À propos de l'auteur (1989)

Fyodor Dostoevsky wrote The Brothers Karamazov, Crime and Punishment, The Idiot, and many other novels.

George Gibian was Goldwin Smith Professor of Russian and Comparative Literature at Cornell University. His honors include Fulbright, Guggenheim, American Philosophical Society, and Rockefeller Foundation fellowships. He was the author of The Man in the Black Coat: Russia's Lost Literature of the Absurd, The Interval of Freedom: Russian Literature During the Thaw, and Tolstoj and Shakespeare. He was the editor of the Norton Critical Editions of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina and War and Peace, and Gogol's Dead Souls, and of the Viking Penguin Portable Nineteenth-Century Russian Reader. Professor Gibian's articles have appeared in the Wall Street Journal, The New Republic, the Christian Science Monitor, and Newsday, among others.

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