Early Soviet Cinema: Innovation, Ideology and Propaganda

Couverture
Wallflower Press, 2000 - 114 pages

Early Soviet Cinema: Innovation, Ideology and Propaganda examines the aesthetics of Soviet cinema during its "golden age" of the 1920s, against a background of cultural ferment and the construction of a new socialist society. Separate chapters are devoted to the work of Sergei Eisenstein, Lev Kuleshov, Vsevolod Pudovkin, Dziga Vertov and Alexander Dovzhenko. Other major directors are also discussed at length. David Gillespie places primary focus on the text, with analysis concentrating on the artistic qualities, rather than the political implications, of each film. The result is not only a discussion of each director's contribution to the "golden age" and to world cinema but also an exploration of their own distinctive poetics.

 

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Table des matières

levkuleshov and the origins of montage in soviet cinema
22
sergei eisenstein and the mythopoetics of revolution
35
conflict and struggle as film art
57
alexander dovzhenko and ukrainian nationalist cinema
79
notes
96
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À propos de l'auteur (2000)

David Gillespie teaches Russian language and culture at the University of Bath, England. He has published widely in the field of modern Russian literature and film.

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