Fear of Security: Australia's Invasion Anxiety

Couverture
Cambridge University Press, 11 févr. 2008 - 289 pages
Rarely has security been such a preoccupation of Australian politics, and rarely has it seemed so far from being achieved. This celebrated book argues that security has dominated and distorted Australia's foreign policy and national life, from Cook's first voyage to the Tampa crisis, 9/11 and Iraq. Whether in the Great War, Vietnam or the treatment of asylum seekers, Anthony Burke shows that Australia's security has been bought with the insecurity and suffering of others. Against this corrosive tradition, he offers a new - cosmopolitan and non-coercive - model of national existence and responsibility. At once a deep historical survey and an argument with its society, Fear of Security is a landmark account of how Australia relates to itself, its region and the world. Turning powerful academic and political orthodoxies on their heads, it is essential reading for those concerned with the burning questions that face Australia and the Asia-Pacific.

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À propos de l'auteur (2008)

Anthony Burke is the author of Beyond Security, Ethics and Violence (Routledge, 2007), and co-editor of Critical Security in the Asia-Pacific (Manchester, 2007) and Introduction to International Relations: Australian Perspectives (Cambridge, 2007). He has published articles in Ethics & International Affairs, Alternatives, International Affairs, The Age, The Canberra Times and The Jakarta Post, and previously worked as a researcher in the Australian Senate. He teaches international politics at the University of New South Wales.

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