Give Me a Break: How I Exposed Hucksters, Cheats, and Scam Artists and Became the Scourge of the Liberal Media...

Couverture
Harper Collins, 25 janv. 2005 - 320 pages
9 Avis
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Working as a correspondent for 20/20 and Good Morning America, John Stossel confronted dozens of scam artists: from hacks who worked out of their basements to some of America's most powerful executives and leading politicians. His efforts shut down countless crooks -- both famous and obscure. Then he realized what the real problem was.

In Give Me a Break, Stossel takes on the regulators, lawyers, and politicians who thrive on our hysteria about risk and deceive the public in the name of safety. Drawing on his vast professional experience (as well as some personal ones), Stossel presents an engaging, witty, and thought-provoking argument about the beneficial powers of the free market and free speech.

 

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LibraryThing Review

Avis d'utilisateur  - justindtapp - LibraryThing

tossel is great and unique. Check out his website. He is from the opposite economic spectrum from Krugman, readily quoting Milton Friedman and Frederick Von Hayek. His book is about journalism, and so ... Consulter l'avis complet

LibraryThing Review

Avis d'utilisateur  - melydia - LibraryThing

This is a quick read. I enjoyed Stossel's conversational tone and his no-nonsense way of addressing the issues. And in general I agree that government needs to shrink, lawsuits need to be reduced, and ... Consulter l'avis complet

Table des matières

What Happened to Stossel?
1
Confrontations
13
Confusion
27
Epiphany
49
Scaring Ourselves to Death
73
Junk Science and Junk Reporting
97
Government
117
Welfare for the Rich
135
The Left Takes Notice
179
Its Not My Fault
201
But What About the Poor?
217
Greed or Ambition?
239
Owning Your Body
255
Free Speech
273
ACKNOWLEDGMENTS
287
INDEX
289

The Trouble with Lawyers
155

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Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 131 - Samuel when the people proposed a monarchy; he warned, "the king .... will take your sons and appoint them to himself for his chariots and to be his horsemen, and they shall run before his chariots He will take your daughters to be perfumers and cooks and bakers. He will take your fields and your vineyards and your olive yards, the best of them, and give them to his servants
Page 131 - This will be the manner of the king that shall reign over you : He will take your sons, and appoint them for himself, for his chariots, and to be his horsemen; and some shall run before his chariots.
Page 131 - And he will take your fields, and your vineyards, and your oliveyards, even the best of them, and give them to his servants.
Page 28 - Trade and commerce, if they were not made of indiarubber, would never manage to bounce over the obstacles which legislators are continually putting in their way; and, if one were to judge these men wholly by the effects of their actions and not partly by their intentions, they would deserve to be classed and punished with those mischievous persons who put obstructions on the railroads.
Page 50 - An expert is a man who has made all the mistakes, which can be made, in a very narrow field.
Page 289 - ... a social tyranny more formidable than many kinds of political oppression, since, though not usually upheld by such extreme penalties, it leaves fewer means of escape, penetrating much more deeply into the details of life, and enslaving the soul itself.
Page 118 - The natural progress of things is for liberty to yield and government to gain ground.
Page 286 - ... of the prohibition of alcohol and nicotine. And why limit the government's benevolent providence to the protection of the individual's body only? Is not the harm a man can inflict on his mind and soul even more disastrous than any bodily evils? Why not prevent him from reading bad books and seeing bad plays, from looking at bad paintings and statues and from hearing bad music? The mischief done by bad ideologies, surely, is much more pernicious, both for the individual and for the whole society,...
Page 286 - But once the principle is admitted that it is the duty of government to protect the individual against his own foolishness, no serious objections can be advanced against further encroachments. A good case could be made out in favor of the prohibition of alcohol and nicotine. And why limit the government's benevolent providence to the protection of the individual's body only? Is not the harm a man can inflict on his mind and soul even more disastrous than any bodily evils?

À propos de l'auteur (2005)

John Stossel is co-anchor of ABC's 20/20. He also hosts ABC's John Stossel Specials reports for ABC radio, and ABCNews.com. A graduate of Princeton University, Stossel lives in New York City with his wife and two children. He devotes his time to beach volleyball, youth soccer, and his family.

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