Maps of Meaning: The Architecture of Belief

Couverture
Psychology Press, 1999 - 541 pages
Why would people in different places and times formulate myths and stories with similar symbols and meanings? Are groups of people with different religious or ideological beliefs doomed to eternal conflict? Are the claims of science and religion truly irreconcilable? What might be done to decrease the individual propensity for group-fostered cruelty? Maps of Meaning addresses these questions with a provocative new hypothesis that explores the connection between what modern neuropsychology tells us about the brain and what rituals, myths and religious stories have long narrated. Peterson's ambitious interdisciplinary odyssey draws insights from the worlds of religion, cognitive science and Jungian approaches to mythology and narrative. Maps of Meaning offers a critical guide to the riches of archaic and modern thought and invaluable insights into human motivation and emotion.
 

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Table des matières

Object and Meaning
1
The Domain and Constituent Elements of the Known
14
Three Levels of Analysis
19
Normal Life
23
Revolutionary Adaptation
31
The Ambivalent Nature of Novelty
43
Bounded Revolution
85
The Death of Apsu and the ReEmergence of Tiamat as Threat
116
The Metamythology of the Way Revisited
183
St George and the Dragon
184
The Process of Exploration and Update as the MetaGoal of Existence
186
Order the Great Father as Son of the Uroboros
208
Explored Territory as Orderly Protective Father
209
Explored Territory as Tyrannical Father
212
The Heavenly Genealogy of the Tyrannical and Protective Fathers
213
The Exploratory Hero as Son of the Great Father
214

The Enuma elish in Schematic Representation
123
The Involuntary Descent and Disintegration of Osiris
130
The Birth and Return of Horus Divine Son of Order and Chaos
131
Voluntary Encounter with the Underworld
132
Ascent and Reintegration of the Father
133
The Constituent Elements of Experience as Personality Territory and Process
136
The UroborosPrecosmogonic Dragon of Chaos
141
The Birth of the World Parents
145
The Constituent Elements of the World in Dynamic Relationship
146
Novelty the Great Mother as Daughter of the Uroboros
155
The Spontaneous Personification of Unexplored Territory
158
Unexplored Territory as Destructive Mother
162
Unexplored Territory as Creative Mother
168
The Heavenly Genealogy of the Destructive and Creative Mothers
170
The Exploratory Hero as Son of the Heavenly Mother
182
Adoption of a Shared
216
The Death and Rebirth of the Adolescent Initiate
224
Challenge to the Shared
233
The Paradigmatic Structure of the Known
242
Nested Groups and Individuals
243
The Fragmentary Representation of Procedure and Custom in Image and Word
252
The Dual Death of the Revolutionary Hero
273
The Crucified Redeemer as Dragon of Chaos and Transformation
280
The Socially Destructive and Redemptive Journey of the Revolutionary Hero
281
Archetypes of Response to the Unknown
307
The Divinity of Interest
446
Notes 411
471
References
503
Permissions
513
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À propos de l'auteur (1999)

Jordan B. Peterson is a clinical psychologist and Professor at the University of Toronto and was formerly at Harvard University. He has published numerous articles on drug abuse, alcoholism and aggression.

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