The Archaeology of Late Antique 'Paganism'

Couverture
Luke Lavan, Michael Mulryan
BRILL, 22 juin 2011 - 642 pages
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There is no agreement over how to name the 'pagan' cults of late antiquity. Clearly they were more diverse than this Christian label suggests, but also exhibited tendencies towards monotheism and internal changes which makes it difficult to describe them as 'traditional cults'. This volume, which includes two extensive bibliographic essays, considers the decline of urban temples alongside the varying evolution of other focii of cult practice and identity. The papers reveal great regional diversity in the development of late antique paganism, and suggest that the time has come to abandon a single compelling narrative of 'the end of the temples' based on legal sources and literary accounts. Although temple destructions are attested, in some regions the end of paganism was both gradual and untraumatic, with more co-existence with Christianity than one might have expected. Contributors are Javier Arce, Béatrice Caseau, Georgios Deligiannakis, Koen Demarsin, Jitse H.F. Dijkstra, Demetrios Eliopoulos, James Gerrard, Penelope J. Goodman, David Gwynn, Luke Lavan, Michael Mulryan, Helen G. Saradi, Eberhard W. Sauer, Gareth Sears, Peter Talloen, Peter Van Nuffelen and Lies Vercauteren.
 

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Table des matières

Acknowledgements
ix
List of Contributors
xi
Introduction
xv
Bibliographic Essays
1
The Development of Paganism in Late Antiquity
87
Temples in the West
163
Temples in the East
261
Pagan Statues
437
Sacred Deposits
503
Iconography in Material Culture
573
Abstracts in French
609
Indices
617
Droits d'auteur

Expressions et termes fréquents

À propos de l'auteur (2011)

Luke Lavan is Lecturer in Archaeology at the Centre for Late Antique Archaeology, University of Kent. His doctorate (2001) considered Provincial Capitals in Late Antiquity. He is series editor of "Late Antique Archaeology" and directs the Kent section of Kent-Berlin Late Antique Ostia Project. Michael Mulryan is Associate Research Fellow of the Centre for Late Antique Archaeology, University of Kent. His doctorate (2008) considered The Religious Topography of Late Antique Rome (A.D. 312-440). His research interests focus on the late antique West where he is especially interested in ideas of urban sapce, particularly in relation to religion.

Informations bibliographiques