The Jewel-Hinged Jaw: Notes on the Language of Science Fiction

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Wesleyan University Press, 1 janv. 2012 - 288 pages

Samuel R. Delany's The Jewel-Hinged Jaw appeared originally in 1977, and is now long out of print and hard to find. The impact of its demonstration that science fiction was a special language, rather than just gadgets and green-skinned aliens, began reverberations still felt in science fiction criticism. This edition includes two new essays, one written at the time and one written about those times, as well as an introduction by writer and teacher Matthew Cheney, placing Delany's work in historical context. Close textual analyses of Thomas M. Disch, Ursula K. Le Guin, Roger Zelazny, and Joanna Russ read as brilliantly today as when they first appeared. Essays such as "About 5,750 Words" and "To Read The Dispossessed" first made the book a classic; they assure it will remain one.

 

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Avis d'utilisateur  - Larou - LibraryThing

This book, and in particular the essay opening the collection, “About 5,750 Words” is famous (I wouldn’t know whether justly or not) for being the first attempt to define Science Fiction not by way of ... Consulter l'avis complet

Table des matières

1 About 5750 Words
1
2 Critical Methods Speculative Fiction
17
3 Quarks
29
4 Thickening the Plot
35
5 Faust and Archimedes
43
6 Alyx
59
7 Prisoners Sleep
77
8 Letter to the Symposium on Women In Science Fiction
85
9 To Read The Dispossessed
105
10 A Fictional Architecture That Manages Only with Great Difficulty Not Once to Mention Harlan Ellison
167
APPENDIXES
183
Index
243
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À propos de l'auteur (2012)

Winner of both Hugo and Nebula awards, SAMUEL R. DELANY is a novelist and critic, who currently teaches English and creative writing at Temple University. His critical work has won him the Pilgrim Award for science fiction scholarship. MATTHEW CHENEY is a columnist for Strange Horizons and writes regularly about many topics at his weblog, The Mumpsimus.

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