American Swastika: Inside the White Power Movement's Hidden Spaces of Hate

Couverture
Rowman & Littlefield, 9 juil. 2015 - 190 pages
0 Avis
Les avis ne sont pas validés, mais Google recherche et supprime les faux contenus lorsqu'ils sont identifiés
This second edition of the acclaimed American Swastika provides an up-to-date perspective on the white power movement in America. The book takes readers through hidden enclaves of hate, exploring how white supremacy movements thrive nationwide and how we can work to prevent future violence. Filled with powerful case studies, interviews, and first-person accounts, the book explains the differences between various hate groups, then shows how white supremacy groups cultivate their membership through Aryan homes, parties, rituals, music festivals, and online propaganda.

Featuring updated statistics and examples throughout, the second edition of American Swastika describes most of today’s active white power groups and the legacy of recently disbanded groups. It also discusses new players in the world of white power websites and music and shares new research on how people exit hate groups.

As recent events have made clear that the idea of a “post–racial America” is a myth, American Swastika is essential reading for understanding both how hate builds and how we can work to prevent violence.
 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Aucun commentaire n'a été trouvé aux emplacements habituels.

Table des matières

1 Hidden Spaces of Aryan Hate
1
2 Contemporary Aryan Hate
11
3 Aryan Hate in the Home
21
4 Hate Parties
41
5 The White Power Music Scene
61
6 Virtual Hate
87
7 Private Aryan Communities
105
8 Enduring White Power Activism
125
Appendix
133
Glossary
137
Notes
139
Bibliography
163
Index
171
About the Authors
175
Droits d'auteur

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

À propos de l'auteur (2015)

Pete Simi is associate professor of criminology and criminal justice at the University of Nebraska at Omaha. His research focuses on the social psychological dimensions of interpersonal and collective violence and he is currently studying individuals who leave violent extremism and what types of interventions most effectively facilitate disengagement and deradicalization.

Robert Futrell is professor of sociology and chair at the University of Nevada, Las Vegas. He has published widely on social movements, including the white power movement, as well as on issues of technology, environment, and sustainability in the West.

Informations bibliographiques