CRC Handbook of Alternative Cash Crops

Couverture
CRC Press, 16 août 1993 - 544 pages
The CRC Handbook of Alternative Cash Crops describes 128 crop plants that can be grown as alternatives to cultivated crops, such as tobacco, and narcotic crops, such as opium poppy. Material is presented in alphabetical order by genus and species and includes information on ecology, cultivation, harvesting, economics, and biotic factors. This book will be valuable to AID agents, domestic agricultural extension agents, and soil and crop professionals worldwide.
 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Aucun commentaire n'a été trouvé aux emplacements habituels.

Pages sélectionnées

Table des matières

Section 1
1
Section 2
3
Section 3
5
Section 4
7
Section 5
9
Section 6
18
Section 7
22
Section 8
57
Section 14
129
Section 15
175
Section 16
186
Section 17
191
Section 18
206
Section 19
224
Section 20
311
Section 21
350

Section 9
69
Section 10
75
Section 11
79
Section 12
89
Section 13
105
Section 22
370
Section 23
429
Section 24
459
Droits d'auteur

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 495 - The Nematode Parasites of Plants Catalogued under their Hosts, Commonwealth Agricultural Bureaux, Bucks, England, 1965.
Page 501 - Angers, G-, Teratogenicity study on pyrethrum and rotenone natural origin and ronnel in pregnant rats, J.
Page 491 - Radford, AE, Ahles, HE, and Bell, CR, Manual of the Vascular Flora of the Carolinas, UNC Press, Chapel Hill, 1968.
Page 491 - The pharmacological estimation of juices from the fruits of Passiflora edulis and Passiflora edulis forma flavicarpa.

Références à ce livre

À propos de l'auteur (1993)

James Alan Duke was born in Eastlake, Alabama on April 4, 1929. He learned to play the bass fiddle in high school and began performing with Homer Briarhopper and His Dixie Dudes. At the age of 16, Duke played on a record that the band cut in Nashville. He received bachelor's, master's and doctoral degrees in botany from the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill. He did postdoctoral work as a professor at Washington University in St. Louis and curatorial work at the Missouri Botanical Gardens there. He worked for the Department of Agriculture eventually becoming the head of the Medicinal Plant Laboratory. He was a pioneer in ethnobotany and phytochemicals. He wrote numerous books including The Green Pharmacy: New Discoveries in Herbal Remedies for Common Diseases and Conditions from the World's Foremost Authority on Healing Herbs, Handbook of Medicinal Herbs, and The Peterson Field Guide to Medicinal Plants and Herbs of Eastern and Central North America written with Steven Foster. After retiring from the Agriculture Department, he occasionally conducted tours along the Amazon River and gave tours of his herb farm the Green Farmacy Garden. He died on December 10, 2017 at the age of 88.

Informations bibliographiques