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trines. Take them away, it falls, and we may all bow before the tiara. Admit them, you are a protestant.

If Calvin wished to fix the minutiæ of our belief, be was unfaitbful to the first principle ; he stood in full contradiction to himself; be usurped a right which he refused to the whole assembled church. If this is not clear, nothing can be so."

On this inspiring and much mistaken subject of the doctrines of the reformation we explained ourselves in part in the last number, and our narrowing limits warn us that we must bring these observations to a close. On the appearance of the third letter of M. Grénus, the council of state who,—though it seems they felt with the pastors, for “ what” says one of the writers, “is the decision of a socinian magistracy in behalf of a socinian clergy,” —were yet too much concerned for their dignity to suffer them to encounter such an adversary, forbad the company to make any reply, Grénus was convicted of a libel, and sentenced to three months imprisonment, but in consideration of his age and infirmities, was permitted to remain under arrest in his own house. He died before the term of his imprisonment expired, and his coadjutor, M. Bost, finds nothing better to say of him than this;

“ There are individuals and bodies which only serve the good cause in attacking the bad. Their motives may be pure or not. I engage not at all in this inquiry.

** No one could approve my pronouncing too severe a judgment on a man who has just been called before God. Still I will say, as an historian, that he did not lead a Christian life, and that his writings show by their tone, so harsh and absolutely destitute of unction, that he did not act at all in the spirit of the gospel. They who regard him as having spoken in general only melancholy truths, must acknowledge this."

M. Malan, the ejected minister, on further deliberation, signed the engagement, and was restored to his office, but broke it on the first opportunity, and was again deprived. The malcontents organized themselves into a separate congregation without the pale of the establishment, and as late as our advices reach, were worshipping by themselves in what was called the new church. The sentiments of the company had passed into the French churches of their connexion; of which a traveller in that country, as carly as 1817, whose facts are easily separated from his opinion, thus speaks ;

“ The Protestant clergy of France, may be divided into two classes ; those of the country, to whom may be joined all natives of Switzerland, except the Genevese ; and the Genevese clergy, who serve some of the principal churches of France. The former preach, for the most part, the word of God, without sensibly disfiguring it ; and there are rarely found among them false teachers, properly so called. They have commonly peither great eloquence nor extensive knowledge, while almost all the Genevese one finds more or less distinguished for oratorical talents, extensive learning purity of life, and propriety of deportment. But some fail in Christian humility and simplicity.'

We can add but one remark to these which have already carried us so much further than we anticipated. We do not indulge in weakly founded expectations when we say that the course through which we have traced the Genevan church, may be depended on to be that in which the protestant world is advancing. The progress, if slow, seems to be regular; it is certain, though impeded. Unitarian christianity is the truth of scripture, and therefore the better this is understood, the more will that prevail. It has found its way over barriers of Calvin's building ;—who will build better? among the Genevese clergy, the very élite of protestantism ;-who have studied or prayed more? who have clung more affectionately to the traditions of their fathers, as long as fidelity to a higher principle would let them ? on what happy spot of the world, might the precious influences of God's grace be expected more plentifully to fall ? Let orthodoxy endow its colleges, educate its youth, and distinguish its adroit defenders. The root of its overthrow, which it nourishes, grows faster than itself; and the identical pine seats which the preacher so eloquently apostrophized at the opening of the Andover chapel, may perchance survive the orthodoxy of those whose weight they sustain. Nor are we forgetful that there are harder obstacles to pass than creeds and testlaws. "Blood is redder than wax” says the Scottish proverb. The religious belief, which an age loves to cling to, is written deeper in the history of its ancestry, than in the confessions of its priests; and we are not sure but we should have more tenderness than we could justify to ourselves for the Genevan, who should cast a lingering look on the faith, in the new stimulus of which his fathers were proof against, the treasures of Philip II. and the arms of Charles Emanuel; or for the Scotchman who should love the doctrine of that sermon that was preached to the covenanters on the eve of Loudon Hill. For ourselves, we are not ashamed to confess such a bias towards what was valued by the great and good of old, that, if opinions were indifferent, we would fain think in all things as Eliot and Winthrop thought. But the truth is that we must be content to form our opinions as just and wise men in ancient times formed theirs, without fear or favour. Opinion will not be bound by a form oj trines. Take them away, it falls, and we may all bow before the tiara. Admit them, you are a protestant. If Calvin wished to fix the minutiæ of our belief, he was unfaithful to the first principle ; he stood in full contradiction to himself; he usurped a right which he refused to the whole assembled church. If this is not clear, pothing can be so.”

On this inspiring and much mistaken subject of the doctrines of the reformation we explained ourselves in part in the last number, and our narrowing limits warn us that we must bring these observations to a close. On the appearance of the third letter of M. Grénus, the council of state who,—though it seems they felt with the pastors, for “ what” says one of the writers, " is the decision of a socinian magistracy in behalf of a socinian clergy,” —were yet too much concerned for their dignity to suffer them to encounter such an adversary, forbad the company to make any reply. Grénus was convicted of a libel, and sentenced to three months imprisonment, but in consideration of his age and infirmities, was permitted to remain under arrest in his own house. He died before the term of his imprisonment expired, and his coadjutor, M. Bost, finds nothing better to say of him than this;

“ There are individuals and bodies which only serve the good cause in attacking the bad. Their motives may be pure or not.

I engage not at all in this inquiry.

" No one could approve my pronouncing too severe a judgment on a man who has just been called before God. Still I will say, as an historian, that he did not lead a Christian life, and that his writings show by their tone, so harsh and absolutely destitute of unction, that he did not act at all in the spirit of the gospel. They who regard him as baving spoken in general only melancholy truths, must acknowledge this."

M. Malan, the ejected minister, on further deliberation, signed the engagement, and was restored to his office, but broke it on the first opportunity, and was again deprived. The malcontents organized themselves into a separate congregation without the pale of the establishment, and as late as our advices reach, were worshipping by themselves in what was called the new church. The sentiments of the company passed into the French churches of their connexion

a traveller in that country, as early as 1817

easily se from his opinion, thus sp

" The Protestant el classes ; those of the of Switzerland, exc serve some of th

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words, nor even by those stronger ties with which the recollection of a past age of glory binds it close upon the hearts of a people. It moves quietly, but irresistibly, on towards truth, and will move, till truth is reached.—The destiny of primitive, uncorrupt christianity is thus continually unrolling itself. The roots of its second growth were in the two great protestant principles of the sufficiency of the scriptures, and the right of private judgment. The trunk has risen and swelled in blast and sunshine, till in the magazines of nature there is no longer any tempest that can sway it. It has shot its strong branches abroad.

They stood for a season bare and ungraceful, but at length a beautiful verdure has covered them. The blossoms have spread in a propitious season. The first fruits have already been gathered, and soon it shall bend beneath an abundant harvest that shall be for the healing of the nations.

INTELLIGENCE.

sea.

Evangelical Missionary Society in Massachusetts.-The semiannual meeting of this society was held at Charlestown, on Wednesday, June 20th. The members assembled for the transaction of business at the Washington Hall, and attended divine service in the New Church, of which Rev. Mr. Walker is Pastor; where, after the usual devotional exercises, an appropriate discourse was delivered by the Rev. Joseph Tuckerman, of Chel

The collection taken after the discourse was liberal; and gave evidence of the increasing interest felt in the plan and objects of this useful and important institution.

We insert with great satisfaction the following letter, addressed by Rev. Dr. Channing to the Treasurer of the Society, announce ing a most generous donation. It is published by the unanimous vote of the society, who deemed such a benefaction entitled to their public and cordial acknowledgment. We will hope, that such an example of christian zeal and liberality may find many followers.

Roston, June 20, 1821. DEAR SIR, I lately transmitted to you the sum of two thousand dollars, sent to me by an unknown donor, for the Evangelical Missionary

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