The Myth of Analysis: Three Essays in Archetypal Psychology

Couverture
Northwestern University Press, 1997 - 313 pages
In this work, acclaimed Jungian James Hillman examines the concepts of myth, insights, eros, body, and the mytheme of female inferiority, as well as the need for the freedom to imagine and to feel psychic reality. By examining these ideas, and the role they have played both in and outside of the therapeutic setting, Hillman mounts a compelling argument that, rather than locking them away in some inner asylum or subjecting them to daily self-treatment, man's "peculiarities" can become an integral part of a rich and fulfilling daily life.

Originally published by Northwestern University Press in 1972, this work had a profound impact on a nation emerging self-aware from the 1960s, as well as on the era's burgeoning feminist movement. It remains a profound critique of therapy and the psychological viewpoint, and it is one of Hillman's most important and enduring works.
 

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Table des matières

What Fathers Psyche?
11
Creation of Soul
19
Notions of Creativity
28
An Archetypal Basis for the Notions of Creativity
40
Anima and Psyche
49
Eros
61
Socratic Eros
72
PsycheEros in Felt Experience
79
1 Toward
183
2 Myth and Mental
190
A Speech of the Soul
205
The Abysmal Side of Bodily Man
215
Female Seed
225
WhiteRed
231
Galen
237
On the Physiological FeebleMindedness of Woman
243

The Suffering of Impossible Love
92
Transference
107
Two Ways of Description
117
A Brief Case History
123
Sexualwissenschaft
140
Mind Head
148
A First Summary
154
A Multiplicity of Souls
164
Hysteria
251
Dionysus and Bisexual Consciousness
258
The Mistaken Dionysus
266
Reentering Dionysian Consciousness
281
The End of Analysis
287
Subject Index
299
Index of Proper and Mythological Names
307
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À propos de l'auteur (1997)

James Hillman (April 12, 1926 – October 27, 2011) was an American psychologist. He studied at, and then guided studies for, the C.G. Jung Institute in Zurich, founded a movement toward archetypal psychology and retired into private practice, writing and traveling to lecture, until his death at his home in Connecticut on October 27, 2011.

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