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TABLE exhibiting, at one View, the SUPPLIES granted for the Service of the Year 1775, with the WAYS and MEANS of raising them; each Article being accurately arranged under its sepa. rate Head, &c.

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Senegambia

1,885 4

6,336 O

Charts of Great Britain and Ireland 2,145, 0 0

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Gum Seneca

French prize money

Sale of the ceded islands

Sundry surplusses in the Exchequer, consisting of surplus of duty on rice, apples, cambrick, militia money, &c.

Total of Ways and Means

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STATE

PAPER S.

The humble Address of the Right
Honourable the Lords Spiritual and
Temporal, and Commons, in Par-
liament assembled; presented to his
Majesty on Thursday the 9th of
February, 1775.

Most Gracious Sovereign,

E, your Majesty's most duti

Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and. Commons, in parliament assembled, return your majesty our most humble thanks for having been graciously pleased to communicate to us the several papers relating to the present state of the British cofonies in America, which, by your majesty's commands, have been laid before us: We have taken them into our most serious consideration; and we find, that a part of your majesty's subjects, in the province of the Massachusett's-Bay, have proceeded so far as to resist the authority of the supreme legislature; that a rebellion at this time actually exists within the said province; and we see, with the utmost concern, that they have been countenanced and encouraged by unlawful combinations and engagements, entered into by your majesty's subjects in several of the other colonies, to the injury and oppression of many of their inno

cent fellow-subjects, resident within the kingdom of Great-Britain, and the rest of your majesty's dominions: This conduct, on their part, appears to us the more inexcusable, when we consider with how much temper your majesty, and the two houses of parliament, have acted in support of the laws

We can never so far desert the trust reposed in us, as to relinquish any part of the sovereign authority over all your majesty's dopinions, which, by law, is vested in your majesty and the two houses of parliament; and the conduct of many persons, in several of the colonies, during the late disturbances, is alone sufficient to convince us how necessary this power is for the protection of the lives and fortunes of your majesty's subjects.

We ever have been, and always shall be, ready to pay attention and regard to any real grievances of any of your majesty's subjects, which shall, in a dutiful and constitutional manner, be laid before us; and, whenever any of the colonies shall make a proper appli cation to us, we shall be ready to afford them every just and reasonable indulgence: At the same time, we consider it as our indispensable duty humbly to beseech your ma[2] 4 jesty,

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