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This work, furthermore, is something of a novelty in the musical way, since it is printed and arranged on a NEW SYSTEM OF NOTATION, which is designed to simplify and facilitate the study of the science of vocal music in an extraordinary degree. We cannot, however, more briefly state tho peculiarities of the new system, than in the language of the preface:

“Professor J. B. Aikin,* in his 'Christian Minstrel," published in Philadelphia, has introduced a new system of musical notation, which greatly abbreviates the time of study, by mov a number of useless and perplexing distinctions which have too long encumbered this most useful and delightful science. This work is published on that system, in the full persuasion that it is evidently so superior to the other systems of notation that it cannot but soon pass into favor with all who become acquainted with it. These improvements constst chiefly of the following particulars:

1. In correcting the position of the letters on the staff. 2. Discarding the theory of the minor scale.

3. The use of flats and sharps as signatures, to determine the key, is laid aside.

4. The use of only three varieties of time instead of nine. 5. The shape of every note in the scale indicates its name.

A few words will be deemed sufficient in explanation of these particulars. Formerly the letters were applied

the staff in three diff rent ways Iero are three not only differing but conflicting theories in the principle of setting the letters to the staff, in the same book, nay in the same tune! Why embarrass the pupil with three systems, when one answers every purpose? The truth is, few learners ever made themselves familiar with more than oue system of lettering, the one belonging to the part they were taught to sing. The Base singers, for example, learned the letters as applied to their staff

, chiefly or ontirely neglecting the others; and so of the rest. At length authors struck out the C cleff, thus reducing, by one third, the course of study in this branch of the science. This was found to answer every purpose of the former method. But still there remain two systems to be taught and learned. And why not, as here proposed, proceed one step far ther, and set the letters on all the staffs aliko ? Then, when one is learnedall are learned.

Another very important advantage in this improvement is, that it ena. bles the performer to discover and trace the harmony of all the parts with 80 much ease. The most difficult thing, perhaps for the pupil to acquire, in the whole course of his study, is the relation of the notes or sounds of the Base to the other parts. In spite of theory, he wants to believe that notes on the same line or space in all the staffs are on the same degree of sound. But the double notation theory says No: and it is hard for him to understand and believe this contradiction of the voice of common sense. By the single system of notation this difficulty is removed; and he feels the fitness of placing the same letter, the same note, and the same sound, on the same line or space of all the staffs.

2. In regard to the theory of the minor scale. It is said that every major scale has a relative minor, and that this minor scale is obtained by a new and artificial arrangement of the semitones. It is confessed that it is not natural, but “artificial.” Now the simple truth touching this point is, that there is one, only one scale of musical sounds, embracing seven intervals. This one natural scale, with its sharp 4th, 5th, &c., contains every possible variety of musical sound. All music is composed in this scale. What is called the minor scale is in fact portions of two scales. Take a range of sounds commencing below the Key, on the 6th of the scale, and

*The author is indebted to this gentleman for much assistance in preparing this volume, especially in reference to the introductory matter.

he will fail to discharge it to others. If he neglect his own salvation, we cannot expect him to feel interested in the salvation of his family or neighbors. It is the imperious duty of every one to re. form himself

. We need more devotional reading of the Holy Scriptures, and meditation thereon. We are so constituted that we will imbibe the feelings and habits of those with whom we associate. If we are much in the company o. Christ and his Apostles, and are communing with them, we will imbibe their spirit and emulate their example. Who would not possess the patience of Job, the devotional feelings of David, the zeal, hope, and self denial of Paul, and the tenderness and resignation of our sympathetic High Priest? Oh! how delightful to linger around the “cross of Christ,” and feel its hallowed and life giving influence shed upon our souls. There, ev. ery murmur is hushed, and the heart learns the lesson of resigna. tion while gazing on a suffering Saviour, and how cheering to an. ticipate the hour when we shall meet with him who died for us; and with all who have been redeemed by him. “If such the sweetness of the streams, Oh, what will the fountain be?” We need more private prayer.

There are other matters, but my sheet admonishes me to close. Remember me to all my friends, and especially to every member of the Bethany family. I hope to see them all ere long; but I shall not see all that I left there. Death has removed three from that happy circle. When I parted from them in tears, little did I suppose that it would be my last salutation. Their absence will rob my visit of much of its enjoyment. I shall only then realize that they are gone. I have never met with a family whose hearts were so closely bound by the ties of affection and sympathy, and yet how often have those ties been broken. Death has plucked from that circle some of the fairest flowers of earth; but they are blooming in a more congenial clime, where death never enters. Remember me when you approach a throne of Grace. Farewell, my aged father in Christ, may the Lord sustain you in your declining years, and may your path shine brighter and brighter, is the prayer of your brother, who hopes to meet you, when life and its toils are o'er, in the haven of eternal rest.

ROBERT Y. HENLEY.

A.S. HAYDEN'S NEW MUSIC BOOK. As the subject of church music deservedly receives a cousiderable share of attention, I beg leave to introduce to the notice of the readers of the Harbinger, a collection of church music lately published by our excellent and devoted brother A. S. HAYDEN. The book is entitled “THE SACRED MELODEON," and comprises upon its 304 pages, a choice variety of the most approved pieces from the old standard authors, with many original compositions. It is certainly a very fine collection," embracing all the kinds of metre used in the hymn book, with many others, and a number of set pieces, anthems, &c., more than sufficient for all the purpos. es of public or family worship, and singing-schools.

This work, furthermore, is something of a novelty in the musical way, since it is printed and arranged on a NEW SYSTEM OF NOTATION, which is designed to simplify and facilitate the study of the science of vocal music in an extraordinary degree. We cannot, however, more briefly state the peculiarities of the new system, than in the language of the preface:

“Professor J. B. Aikin,* in his ‘Christian Minstrel,” published in Philadelphia, has introduced a new system of musical notation, which greatly abbreviates the time of study, by removing a number of useless and perplexing distinctions which have too long encumbered this most useful and delighiful science. This work is published on that system, in the full persuasion that it is evidently so superior to the other systems of notation that it cannot but soon pass into favor with all who become acquainted with it. These improvements consist chiefly of the following particulars:

1. In correcting the position of the letters on the staff. 2. Discarding the theory of the minor scale.

3. The use of flats and sharps as signatures, to determine the key, is laid aside.

4. The use of only three varieties of time instead of nine. 5. The shape of every note in the scale indicates its name.

A few words will be deemed sufficient in explanation of these particulars. Formerly the letters were applied to the staff in three diff rent ways. Here are three not only differing but conflicting theories in the principle of setting the letters to the staff, in the same book, nay in the same tune! Why embarrass the pupil with three systems, when one answers every purpose? The truth is, few learners ever made themselves familiar with more than ove system of lettering, the one belonging to the part they were taught to sing. The Base singers, for example, learned the letters as applied to their staff, chiefly or ontirely neglecting the others; and so of the rest. At length authors struck out the C cleff, thus reducing, by one third, the course of study in this branch of the science. This was found to answer every purpose of the former method. But still there remain two systems to be taught and learned. And why not, as here proposed, proceed one step farther, and set the letters on all the staffs aliko ? Then, when one is learnedall are learned.

Another very important advantage in this improvement is, that it ena. bles the performer to discover and trace the harmony of all the parts with 80 much ease. The most difficult thing, perhaps for the pupil to acquire, in the whole course of his study, is the relation of the notes or sounds of the Base to the other parts. In spite of theory, he wants to believe that notes on the same line or space in all the staffs are on the same degree of sound. But the double notation theory says No: and it is hard for him to understand and believe this contradiction of the voice of common sense. By the single system of notation this difficulty is removed; and he feels the fitness of placing the same letter, the same note, and the same sound, on the same line or space of all the staffs.

2. In regard to the theory of the minor scale. It is said that every major scale has a relative minor, and that this minor scale is obtained by a new and artificial arrangement of the semitones. It is confessed that it is not natural, but “artificial.” Now the simple truth touching this point is, that there is one, only one scale of musical sounds, embracing seven intervals. This one natural scale, with its sharp 4th, 5th, &c., contains ev. ery possible variety of musical sound. All music is composed in this scale. What is called the minor scale is in fact portions of two scales. Take a range of sounds commencing below the Key, on the 6th of the scale, and

*The author is indebted to this gentleman for much assistance in preparing this volume, especially in reference to the introductory matter.

ascend above the key to the 6th of the scale above, and compose tunes in this range, with reference to the 6th as the tonic, and such tunes will generally have a plaintive and soothing effect; not “artificially," but naturally: and then the semitones remain in their natural places and obey their own ordinary rules. It follows, therefore, that when the pupil is fully instructed in the octave, he has fully learned all the natural sounds, and all their relations. Then after the scholar has learned all this, to tell him there is another set of scales, called minor, is to tell him what is not true in fact, and to confuse and perplex his mind with new and useless distinctions.

3. How to find the key. To ascertain the place of one, or the first degree of the scale, flats or sharps are set at the beginnủng of the tunes. These flats and sharps are styled the "signature," or sign of the key. This sign is a dark symbol to myriads. And why use the difficult sign, when the word key so plainly tells precisely the same thing.

4. The continued use of nine or more varieties of time seems not necessary. All authors, indeed nature herself, recognise three kinds of measure, depending on the spirit or movement of the tune. 1. The double measure; 2. The triple; 3. The compound.-More than these there are not. But authors have divided the double measure into four varieties; the triple into three; the compound into two. The object of so many varieties is to direct the rate or time of singing the tune. But it is clear that these signs of time do not give the tune any certain or absolute movement. The speed or time of performance depends far more on the taste and habits of the leaderthan on these signs. One leader will perform the quickest variety of double measure in more time than another would the slowest. These distinctions answer no purpose therefore, but to impede the progress of the pupil. Use one symbol to show the nature of the measure, and a directive term over the tune to indicate the rate of movement, and every useful purpose is gained.

5. In regard to character notes. Any thing that enables the singer to strike the tones with certainty and fullness is of advantage to the practical musician. Giving to each of the sounds in the octave a symbol or note to represent it, is so manifest an advantage to the performer that it is difficult to see what objection could be reasonably urged against it. The eye is the quickest of all the senses, and not only is the singer directed to the sound by the position of the note, (a conclusion to which he comes, however quickly, by a process of calculation,) but, in addition, he enjoys the advantage of an instantaneous perception of it by the sight of the eye. He can thus leap from one interval to another, and range through all the tones with a facility which few attain without this aid. Farther, in the science of numbers we have nine numerical values represented by nine figures or symbols. How absurd to attempt to publish an arithmetic with only one figure; and in which the value which this figure represents could be known only by the position which it occupies! Music books all in round notes are arithmetics with only one figure; those with four shapes have only little more than half enongh figures to represent the values contained in the science. Every sound should have its own note or symbol, and every note its own name.

In this work, as in a former one, the author has endeavored to displace words that are entirely religious, and to supply their place with good moral poetry. The reason for this change will appear obvious and satisfactory on a little reflection. If the Most High “will not hold him guiltless that taketh his name in vain;' and is to utter it in a light and thoughtless manner is to take it in vain, what guilt is incurred in the singing-school! Even the conscientious pnpil is, by the common use of sacred stanzas to the tunes, in some sort obliged to incur the guilt of profanity, as it is nearly or quite impossible for him whilst learning the tune and applying the lines, to bestow the attention on the sentiment that words of devotion require. This is a point of great importance; and parents, if th:ey desire their children to grow up in innocency, with consciences pure and tender, ought not to place them in circumstances where they are obliged to trifle with the most glorious and fearful names that human or angolic language can express. Thanks to many distinguished and conscientious persons, whose influence encourages this reform in the publication of this work. Euclid, Ohio, Nov. 1848.

A. S. HAYDEN. The retail price of the above work is 75 cts. It can be obtained at Beth. any; at H. L. Bosworth's, Pittsburgh; at S. R. & P. G. Collins's, Philadelphia. Orders transmittted to Bethany will be promptly attended to.

R. R.

to me.

OBITUARY. The following obituary I take from the Glasgow Saturday Post, of February 24, forwarded me by a brother in Scotland. The subject of this notice, one of my fellow students in the University of Glasgow, visited me, with much kindness, when in prison in that city, and there made himself known

He also was my physician, and tendered me his medical services, in the sickness consequent on my confinement, from which I really began to recover, only some four or five months since. In a letter from Scotland, . received last month, he sent me his kind remembrances and Christian salutations. But, alas! in a letter from Paisley, only one week after, I was in. formed of his death from a violent attack of cholera. The following notice of his demise, judging only from my own personal knowledge of his character, I presume to be no exaggeration of his excellencies. Peace to his memory, and consolation to his friends!

A.C. DEATH OF DR. GEORGE WATSON. We record to-day the death of one of our most distinguished surgeons, and most useful citizens, Dr. George Watson. This adds another to the sad list of valuable lives that have fallen under the prevailing epidemic. Mr. Watson has been in the practice above 30 years, and enjoyed most deservedly the confidence and esteem of a large circle of patients and friends. His attentions were unremitting, his attentions by night or by day unsparing, his anxieties for their recovery intense, and his gratification at their convalescence unbounded; his manners were singularly pleasing and cheerful, and were eminently fitted to comfort and gladden the inmates of the sick chamber. In addition to great professional excellence and successful efforts for the benefit of his patients, he exhibited the liveliest interest in all that concerned their affairs, and showed himself not only their physician, but also their friend. The church of which he was for many years a deacon, will not easily supply his loss. His attentions to the poor were unremitting His time, advice, and pecuniary aid were always at their service. His genlleness, good temper, Christian deportment, and wisdom endeared him to his brethren in the church, who now mourn over his sudden departure. As a citizen, Mr. Watson was well known as a warm supporter of our religious and benevolent institutions. He has been surgeon to the Night Asylum, since its institution; was a director of the Royal Infirmary, and of various other useful societies. He was highly esteemed by his medical brethren for

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