Images de page
PDF
ePub

The custom so universal of burying the dead with honour, is a witness to the prevalence of the idea that the future life is attached to the body as well as the soul.

As Molière says, –

“ Oui, mon corps, c'est moi-même, et j'en veux prendre soin,

Quenille, si l'on veut; ma quenille m'est chère.” 1
And Heine, in his flippant recklessness-

“ Poor soul doth to the body say:

I'll never leave thee, but I'll stay
With thee.
Thou ever wert my second I,
And round me clungest lovingly,
As though a dress of satin bright
All lined throughout with ermine white
Alas! I've come to nakedness,
A mere abstraction, bodiless
Reduced to blessed nullity
In yon bright realms of light to be.
In the cold halls of heaven up yonder,
In leaden slippers wearily.
'Tis quite intolerable; stay,
Stay with me, my dear body, pray!””

And if the resurrection of the body be a positive idea and earnest wish, it will be fulfilled by Him Who is the sum of all our desires, and Who came on earth to fulfil them. The idea of the immortality of the soul does not exclude the idea of the immortality of the body; both ideas are conciliated in Him Who is “ Yea” and not “Nay,” that is, Who is the category of all that is positive. Jesus Christ, qui in vobis per nos prædicatus est, non fuit EST ET NON, sed Est in illo fuit."3

1 Molière : Les femmes savantes, a. ii. sc. 7.
2 Heine : Poems, tr. by Bowring, Lond. 1866, p. 505.
3 2 Cor. i. 19.

If, then, we may conclude that what we desire imperiously will be placed within our reach by Him Who has come to satisfy our desires, it follows:

1. That death will not terininate our existence. 2. That our condition after death will be one of happi

ness,

3. That this happiness will be eternal. 4. That it will be complete. 5. That it will be exactly commensurate with the desire

felt by man. 6. That, consequently, it will be graduated.

The custom so universal of burying the dead with honour, is a witness to the prevalence of the idea that the future life is attached to the body as well as the soul.

As Molière says,

“ Oui, mon corps, c'est moi-même, et j'en veux prendre soin,

Quenille, si l'on veut; ma quenille m'est chère."1

And Heine, in his flippant recklessness

[ocr errors]

** Poor soul doth to the body say :

I'll never leave thee, but I'll stay
With thee.
Thou ever wert my second I,
And round me clungest lovingly,
As though a dress of satin bright
All lined throughout with ermine white-
Alas ! I've come to nakedness,
A mere abstraction, bodiless
Reduced to blessed nullity
In yon bright realms of light to be.
In the cold halls of heaven up yonder,
In leaden slippers wearily.
"Tis quite intolerable; stay,
Stay with me, my dear body, pray !”?

And if the resurrection of the body be a positive idea and earnest wish, it will be fulfilled by Him Who is the sum of all our desires, and Who came on earth to fulfil them. The idea of the immortality of the soul does not exclude the idea of the immortality of the body; both ideas are conciliated in Him Who is “ Yea" and not “Nay,” that is, Who is the category of all that is positive. “Jesus Christ, qui in vobis per nos prædicatus est, non fuit EST et non, sed Est in illo fuit,"3

[ocr errors]

i Molière : Les femmes savantes, a. Ü. sc. 7.
2 Heine : Poems, tr. by Bowring, Lond. 1866, p. 505.
3 2 Cor. i, 19.

If, then, we may conclude that what we desire imperiously will be placed within our reach by Him Who has come to satisfy our desires, it follows:

1. That death will not terminate our existence. 2. That our condition after death will be one of happi

ness.

3. That this happiness will be eternal. 4. That it will be complete. 5. That it will be exactly commensurate with the desire

felt by man. 6. That, consequently, it will be graduated.

[ocr errors]

CHAPTER XX

DEVELOPMENT

Development, a subject ably treated by others--must be considered here

Were all the propositions of the Faith simultaneously or successively evolved ?--Probably by degrees—If development be denied, two other theories must be maintained—Scripture an absolute authority-This the Protestant theory-Its impossibility-Or that development was suddenly arrested— This the Anglican theory, unsatisfactory-Development apparent in the Bible—and in the history of the Church-Development of doctrine-of Christian art—of appreciation of nature-of science-of constitutionalism--The limits of development-Conclusion - The prospects of Christianity.

MHE subject of development is one upon which I would TH

have foreborne touching, as it has been so ably discussed by distinguished theologians of late years, and I can but go over ground already trodden, but that it fits into and completes the system I am expounding, and I could not omit the doctrine of development without leaving this essay incomplete.

I can but adopt the arguments of others, and shew their application to and cohesion with the dogma of the Incarnation,

I have shewn in the preceding chapters that the dogmas

1 Newman: Essay on Development. Oxenham: The Doctrine of the Atonement, Introd. Essay. And Blenkinsopp: The Doctrine of Development in the Bible and in the Church. London, 1869.

« PrécédentContinuer »