Elements of International Law

Couverture
Little, Brown, 1866 - 749 pages

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Table des matières

Hostages for the Execution of Treaties
365
Enemys Property found in the Territory on the Commencement
378
Debts due to the Enemy
388
Trade with the Common Enemy unlawful on the Part of Allied Sub
401
The Native Character easily reverts
407
Merchants residing in the East
418
National Character of Ships
425
Amy Warwick The 24 Law Report Betsey The Bee 67
438
Privateers
453
Recapture of Neutral Property
460
What constitutes a Settingforth as a Vessel of War
472
Condemnation of Property lying in the Ports of an Ally
478
Claim on the Ground of the Violatiou of Neutral Territory must
479
Unjust Sentence of a Foreign Court is Ground for Reprisal 391
492
Period of its Operation
498
Ransom of Captured Property
505
Restitution by the Neutral State of Property captured within
528
United States Neutrality Acts
534
Anna The 5 Rob Adm 373 257 521 526 Betsey Cathcart The Bee 292
543
British ForeignEnlistment
566
Prize Courts of the United States condemn Enemys Goods in Neu
603
et
630
344
635
Carrying Diplomatic Despatches
636
Messengers and Carriers
638
Must be taken in delicto
645
Rule of the War of 1756
663
Anna Catharina The 4 Robinson Birkenhead The 6 Notes of Cases
666
Hallie Jackson
682
Right of Visitation and Search
688
Forcible Resistance by an Enemy Master
696
234
705
Freedom of Religious Worship
712
Effect of Restoration of Territory by a Treaty of Peace
715
Antelope The 10 Wheaton 66 123
726
Arrogante Barcelones The 7 Whea British Prisoners The 1 Woodb
733
Immunity of the Neutral Territory how far extended to Neutral
736
478
742
Persons exempt from Acts of Hostility
743

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Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 108 - With the movements in this hemisphere we are of necessity more immediately connected, and by causes which must be obvious to all enlightened and impartial observers. The political system of the allied powers is essentially different in this respect from that of America.
Page 108 - In the wars of the European powers, in matters relating to themselves, we have never taken any part, nor does it comport with our policy so to do.
Page 314 - British fishermen shall use (but not to dry or cure the same on that island) and also on the coasts, bays and creeks of all other of His Britannic Majesty's dominions in America...
Page 99 - In the discussions to which this interest has given rise, and in the arrangements by which they may terminate, the occasion has been judged proper for asserting as a principle in which the rights, and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers.
Page 105 - America; nor will either make use of any protection which either affords or may afford, or any alliance which either has or may have, to or with any State or People for the purpose of erecting or maintaining any such fortifications, or of occupying, fortifying, or colonizing Nicaragua, Costa Rica, the Mosquito Coast or any part of Central America, or of assuming or exercising dominion over the same...
Page 108 - Our policy in regard to Europe, which was adopted at an early stage of the wars which have so long agitated that quarter of the globe, nevertheless remains the same, which is, not to interfere in the internal concerns of any of its powers...
Page 227 - ... that any country that may be claimed by either party on the northwest coast of America, westward of the Stony Mountains, shall, together with its harbours, bays, and creeks, and the navigation of all rivers within the same, be free and open, for the term of ten years from the date of the signature of the present convention, to the vessels, citizens, and subjects of the two Powers...
Page 314 - Magdalen Islands, and Labrador, so long as the same shall remain unsettled; but so soon as the same or either of them shall be settled, it shall not be lawful for the said fishermen to dry or cure fish at such settlement, without a previous agreement for that purpose with the inhabitants, proprietors, or possessors of the ground.
Page 97 - It is impossible that the Allied Powers should extend their political system to any portion of either continent without endangering our peace and happiness ; nor can any one believe that our southern brethren, if left to themselves, would adopt it of their own accord. It is equally Impossible, therefore, that we should behold such interposition in any form with indifference.
Page 233 - America not included within the abovementioned limits; provided, however, that the American fishermen shall be admitted to enter such bays or harbours for the purpose of shelter and of repairing damages therein, of purchasing wood, and of obtaining water, and for no other purpose whatever.

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