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SQUEDULE (C). Products or Manufactures of the United States to be admitted into Cuba and

Porto Rico at a reduction of Duty of 50 per cent.

15. Marble, jasper, and alabaster, of all kinds, cut into flags, slabs, or steps, and the same worked or carved in all kinds of articles, polished or not.

16. Glass and crystal ware, plate and window glass, and the same silvereil, quicksilvered, and platinized.

47. Clay in tiles, large and small, and mosaic for pavements, coloured tiles, roof tiles glazed, and pipes.

48. Stoneware and fine earthenware, and porcelain.

49. Iron, cast, in fine manufactures or those polished, with coating of porcelain or part of other metals (see repertory).

50. Iron, wrought, and steel, in axles, tires, springs, and wheels for carriages, rivets, and their washers.

51. Iron, wrought, and steel, in fine manufactures or those polished, with conting of porcelain or part of other metals, not expressly comprised in other numbers of these Schedules, and platform scales for weighing (see repertory).

32. Needles, pens, knives (table and carving), razors, pen-knives, scissors, pieces for watches, and other similar articles of iron and steel.

53. Tin-plate, in sheets or manufactured.

51. Copper, bronze, brass, and nickel, and alloys of same with common metals, in lump or bars, and all manufactures of the same.

35. All other commou metals and alloys of the same, in lump or bars, and all manufactures of the same, plain, varnished, gilt, silvered, or nickeled.

36. Furniture of all kinds, of wood or metal, including school furniture, blackboards and other materials for schools, and all kinds of articles of fine woods not expressly comprised in other numbers of these Schedules (see repertory).

57. Rushes, esparto, vegetable hair, broom corn, willow, straw, palm, and other similar materials, manufactured into articles of all kinds.

58. Pastes for soups, rice flour, bread, and crackers, and alimentary farinas, but comprised in other numbers of these Schedules.

39. Preserved alimentary substances and canned goods, not comprised in other numbers of these Schedules, including sausages, stuffed meats, mustards, mauces, pickles, jams, and jellies.

60. Rubber and gutta-percha, and manufutures thereof, alone or mixed with other substances (except silk), and oilclothis and tarpaulin,

61. Rice, hulled or unhulled.

SCHEDULE (D).

Products or Manufactures of the United States to be admille into Cuba and

Porto Rico at a reduction of duty of 25 per cent.

62. Petroleum, refined, and benzine.

63. Cotton, manufactured, spun or twisted, and in goods of all kinds, woven of knit, and the same mixed with other vegetable or animal fibres in which cotton is an equal or greater component part, and clothing exclusively of cotton.

61. Rope, coriage, and twino, of all kinds.

65. Colours, crude and prepared, with or without oil, inks of all kinds, shoeblacking and varnishes.

66. Soap, toilet, and perfumery.
67. Medicines, proprietary or patent, and all others, and drugs.
68. Stearine' and tallow manufactured in candles.

69. Paper for printing, for decorating rooms, of wood or straw for wrapping and packing, and bags and boxes of same, sand-paper, and paste-board.

70. Leather and skins, tanned, dressed, varnished, or japanned, of all kinds, including sole-leather or belting.

71. Boots and shoes, in whole or in part of leather or skins.

72. Trunks, valises, travelling-bags, portfolios, and other similar articles, in whole or in part of leather.

73. Harness and saddlery of all kinds.

74. Watches and clocks, of gold, silver, or other metals, with cases of stone, wood, or other material, plain or ornamented.

75. Carriages of two or four wheels, and pieces of the same.

It is uuderstood that flour which, on its exportation from the United States, has been favoured with drawbacks shall not sbare in the foregoing reduction of duty.

The provisional arrangement as set forth in the Transitory Schedule sball come to an end on the 1st July, 1892, and on that date be substituted by the definitive arrangement as set forth in Schedules (A), (B), (C), and (D).

And that the Government of Spain bas further provided that the laws and regulations adopted to protect its revenue and prevent fraud in the declarations and proof that the articles named in the foregoing Schedules are the product or manufacture of the United States of America shall place no undue restrictions on the importer, nor impose any additional charges or fees therefor on the articles imported.

And whereas the Secretary of State has, by my direction, given assurance to the Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of Spain at Washington that this action of the Government of Spain, in granting exemption of duties to the products and manufactures of the United States of America on their importation into Cuba and Porto Rico is accepted for those islands as a due reci. procity for the action of Congress as set forth in section 3 of said Act:

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Benjamin Harrison, President of the United States of America, have caused the above stated modifications of the Tariff laws of Cuba and Porto Rico to be made public for the information of the citizens of the United States of America.

In testimony whereof i have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Waslıington, this 31st day of July, 1891, and of the Independence of the United States of America the 116th.

(L.S.) BENJ. HARRISON. By the President: WILLIAM F. WHARTON, Acting Secretary of State.

PROCLAMATION by the President of the United States,

respecting a Reciprocal Commercial Arrangement between the United States and the Dominican Republic. ---Washington, August 1, 1891.

WHEREAS, pursuant to section 3 of the Act of Congress approved the 1st October, 1890, entitled “An Act to reduce the revenue and equalize duties on imports, and for other purposes,” the Secretary of State of the United States of America communicated to the Government of the Dominican Republic the action of the Congress of the United States of America, with a view to secure reciprocal trade, in declaring the articles enumerated in said section 3, to wit, sugars, molasses, coffee, and hides, to be exempt from duty upon their importation into the United States of America:

And whereas the Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the Dominican Republic at Washington has communicated to the Special Plenipotentiary of the United States the fact that, in reciprocity and compensation for the admission into the United States of America free of all duty of the articles enumerated in section 3 of said Act, the Government of the Dominican Republic will, by due legal enactment, admit, from and after the 1st September, 1891, into all the established ports of entry of the Dominican Republic, the articles or merchandize named in the following Schedules, on the terms stated therein, provided that the same be the product or inanufacture of the United States and proceed directly from the ports of said States :

SCHEDULE (A). Articles to be admitted free of Duty into the Dominican Republic. 1. Animals, live. 2. Meats of all kinds, salted or in brine, but not smoked. 3. Corn or maize, corn-meal and starch. 4. Oats, barley, rye, and buckwheat, and four of these cereals. 5. Hay, bran, and straw for forage. 6. Troes, plante, vines, and seeds and grains of all kinds for propagation.

7. Cotton-seed oil, and meal-cake of same.

8. Tallow, in cake or melted, and oil for machinery, subject to examination and proof respecting the use of said oil.

9. Resin, tar, pitch, and turpentine.
10. Manures, natural and artificial.
11. Coal, mineral.
12. Mineral waters, natural and artificial.
13. Ice.

14. Machines, including steam-engines, and those of all other kinds, andi parts of the same, implements and tools for agricultural, mining, manufacturing, industrial, and scientific purposes, including carts, waggons, hand-carts, and wheel-barrows, and parts of the same.

15. Material for the construction and equipment of railways.

16. Iron, cast and wrought, and steel, in pigs, bars, rods, plates, beams, rafters, and other similar articles for the construction of buildings, and in wire, nails, screws, and pipes.

17. Zinc, galvanized and corrugated iron, tin and lead in sheets, asbestos, tar-paper, tiles, slate, and other material for roofing.

18. Copper, in bars, plates, nails, and screws. 19. Copper and lead pipe.

20. Bricks, fire-bricks, cement, lime, artificial stone, paving tiles, marble and other stones, in rough, dressed, or polished, and other earthy materials used in building.

21. Windmills.

22. Wire, plain or barbed, for fences, with hooks, staples, nails, and similar articles used in the construction of fences.

23. Telegraph wire, and telegraphic, telephonic, and electrical apparatus of all kinds for communication and illumination.

21. Wood and lumber of all kinds for building, in logs or pieces, beams, rafters, planks, boards, shingles, flooring, joists, wooden houses, mounted or unmounted, and accessory parts of buildings.

25. Cooperage of all kinds, including staves, headings, and hoops, barrels, and boxes, mounted or unmounted.

26. Materials for ship-building. 27. Boats and lighters.

28. School furniture, black-boards, and other articles exclusively for the use of schools.

29. Books, bound or unbound, pamphlets, newspapers, and printed inatter, and paper for printing newspapers.

30. Printers' inks of all colours, type, leads, and all accessories for printing. 31. Sacks, empty, for packing sugar. 32. Gold and silver coin and bullion,

SCHEDULE (B). Articles to be admitted into the Dominican Republic at a reduction of Duty

of 25 per cent. 33. Meats not included in Schedule (A) and meat products of all kinds, except lard.

34. Butter, cheese, and condensed or canned milk. 35. Fish and shell-fish, salted, dried, smoked, pickled, or preserved in cans. 36. Fruits and vegetables, fresh, cauned, dried, pickled, or, preserved.

37. Manufactures of iron and steel, single or mixed, not included in Sche

dule (A).

38. Cotton, manufactured, spun or twisted, and in fabrics of all kinds, woven or knit, and the same fabrics mixed with other vegetable or animal fibres in which cotton is the equal or greater component part.

39. Boots and shoes, in whole or in part of leather or skins.

40. Paper for writing, in envelopes, ruled or blank books, wall-paper, paper for wrapping and packing, for cigarettes, in cardboard, boxes and bags, sandpaper, and pasteboard.

41. Tin-plate and tin ware, for arts, industries, and domestic uses. 42. Cordage, rope, and twine, of all kinds.

43. Manufactures of wood of all kinds not embraced in Schedule (A), including wooden ware, implements for household use, and furniture, in whole or in part of wood.

And that the Government of the Dominican Republic has further provided that the laws and regulations adopted to protect its revenue and prevent fraud in the declarations and proof that the articles named in the foregoing Schedules are the product or manufacture of the United States of America shall place no undue restrictions on the importer, nor impose any additional charges or fees therefor on the articles imported.

And whereas the Special Plenipotentiary of the United States has, by my direction, given assurance to the Envoy Extraordinary and Minister Plenipotentiary of the Dominican Republic at Washington that this action of the Government of the Dominican Republic, in granting exemption of duties to the products and manufactures of the United States of America on their importation into the Dominican Republic, is accepted as a due reciprocity for the action of Congress as set forth in section 3 of said Act :

Now, therefore, be it known that I, Benjamin Harrison, President of the United States of America, have caused the above stated modifications of the Tariff laws of the Dominican Republic to be made public for the information of the citizens of the United States of America.

In testimony whereof I have hereunto set my hand and caused the seal of the United States to be affixed.

Done at the city of Washington, this 1st day of August, 1891, and of the Independence of the United States of America the 116th.

(L.S.) BENJ. HARRISON. By the President: WILLIAM F. WHARTON, Acting Secretary of State.

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