Electronic Transport in Mesoscopic Systems

Couverture
Cambridge University Press, 15 mai 1997 - 377 pages
Recent advances in semiconductor technology have made possible the fabrication of structures whose dimensions are much smaller than the mean free path of an electron. This book gives the first thorough account of the theory of electronic transport in such mesoscopic systems. Beginning with coverage of fundamental concepts, the book presents a detailed account of transmission function formalism which is used to describe three key topics in mesoscopic physics: the quantum Hall effect, localization, and double-barrier tunneling. Other sections include a discussion of optical analogies to mesoscopic phenomena, followed by a concluding description of the non-equilibrium Green's function formalism and its relation to the transmission formalism. Complete with problems and solutions, the book will be of great interest to graduate students of mesoscopic physics and nanoelectronic device engineering, as well as to established researchers in these fields.
 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Aucun commentaire n'a été trouvé aux emplacements habituels.

Pages sélectionnées

Table des matières

Acknowledgements
A few common symbols
Introductory remarks
1
Preliminary concepts
6
11 Twodimensional electron gas 2DEG
7
12 Effective mass density of states etc
10
13 Characteristic lengths
16
14 Lowfield magnetoresistance
23
Exercises
194
Localization and fluctuations
196
51 Localization length
197
52 Weak localization
201
53 Effect of magnetic field
210
54 Conductance fluctuations
215
55 Diagrammatic perturbation theory
222
Summary
242

15 Highfield magnetoresistance
26
16 Transverse modes or magnetoelectric subbands
29
17 Drift velocity or Fermi velocity?
37
Summary
44
Exercises
45
Conductance from transmission
48
21 Resistance of a ballistic conductor
50
22 Landauer formula
57
23 Where is the resistance?
65
24 What does a voltage probe measure?
74
25 Nonzero temperature and bias
86
26 Exclusion principle?
93
27 When can we use the LandauerButtiker formalism?
102
Summary
110
Exercises
112
Transmission function Smatrix and Greens functions
117
31 Transmission function and the Smatrix
119
32 Combining Smatrices
125
a brief introduction
132
34 Smatrix and the Greens function
139
or the method of finite differences
141
36 Selfenergy
151
37 Relation to other formalisms
157
38 Feynman paths
163
Summary
168
Exercises
170
Quantum Hall effect
175
41 Origin of zero resistance
176
42 Effect of backscattering
188
Summary
193
Doublebarrier tunneling
246
61 Coherent resonant tunneling
247
62 Effect of scattering
256
63 Singleelectron tunneling
266
Summary
272
Exercises
273
Optical analogies
276
72 Linear optics
279
73 Nonlinear optics
285
74 Coherent sources
288
Summary
290
Exercises
291
Nonequilibrium Greens function formalism
293
81 Correlation and scattering functions
294
82 Selfenergy and the Greens function
300
83 Kinetic equation
304
84 Calculating the selfenergy
306
85 Summary of solution procedure
311
86 Current flow and energy exchange
315
87 Relation to the LandauerButtiker formalism
319
88 Relation to the Boltzmann formalism
322
89 Strongly interacting systems
328
resonant tunneling with phonon scattering
330
Summary
338
Exercises
339
Concluding remarks
343
Solutions to exercises
345
Index
375
Droits d'auteur

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

À propos de l'auteur (1997)

fm.author_biographical_note

Informations bibliographiques