The Politics of the Environment: Ideas, Activism, Policy

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Cambridge University Press, 19 avr. 2007
The continuous rise in the profile of the environment in politics reflects growing concern that we may be facing a large-scale ecological crisis. The new edition of this highly acclaimed textbook surveys the politics of the environment, providing a comprehensive and comparative introduction to its three components: ideas, activism and policy. Part I explores environmental philosophy and green political thought; Part II considers parties and environmental movements; and Part III analyses policy-making and environmental issues at international, national and local levels. This second edition has been thoroughly updated with new and revised discussions of many topics including the ecological state, ecological citizenship, ecological modernisation and the Greens in government and also includes an additional chapter on 'Globalisation, Trade and the Environment'. As well as considering a wide variety of examples from around the world, this textbook features a glossary, guides to further study, chapter summaries and critical questions throughout.

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Table des matières

1
1
modern environmentalism Ozone depletion
5
2
13
SENTIENT BEINGS INDIVIDUAL LIVING PLANTSTREES BIOSPHERE
19
3
41
32 Population growth
44
Must a green polity be decentralised?
58
Figure 32 Mapping ecologism
78
Administrative fragmentation
186
8
207
Governance Technology Policy integration Policy tools Civil
215
85 Equity and the elephant
221
Ecological modernisation in practice
233
9
241
Global environmental politics and
265
10
271

4
87
Green parties as new politics?
96
5
115
The greening of established parties
127
0
131
6
143
Critical question 2
155
7
173
Conclusion
288
11
291
Integration
293
Democracy and participation
313
12
321
Policy instruments and climate change
341
Critical question 4
349
13
353

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Fréquemment cités

Page 176 - Therein is the tragedy. Each man is locked into a system that compels him to increase his herd without limit — in a world that is limited. Ruin is the destination toward which all men rush, each pursuing his own best interest in a society that believes in the freedom of the commons. Freedom in a commons brings ruin to all.
Page 222 - In order to protect the environment, the precautionary approach shall be widely applied by States according to their capabilities. Where there are threats of serious or irreversible damage, lack of full scientific certainty shall not be used as a reason for postponing cost-effective measures to prevent environmental degradation.
Page 245 - Regimes can be defined as sets of implicit or explicit principles, norms, rules and decision-making procedures around which actors expectations converge in a given area of international relations.
Page 22 - A thing is right when it tends to preserve the integrity, stability, and beauty of the biotic community. It is wrong when it tends otherwise.
Page 20 - The flourishing of human life and cultures is compatible with a substantial decrease of the human population. The flourishing of nonhuman life requires such a decrease.
Page 283 - Environmental protection requirements must be integrated into the definition and implementation of other Community policies.
Page 20 - The ideological change is mainly that of appreciating life quality (dwelling in situations of inherent value) rather than adhering to an increasingly higher standard of living. There will be a profound awareness of the difference between big and great.
Page 184 - A has power over B to the extent that he can get B to do something that B would not otherwise do.
Page 219 - Sustainable production and consumption [are] the use of goods and services that respond to basic needs and bring a better quality of life, while minimizing the use of natural resources, toxic materials and emissions of waste and pollutants over the life cycle, so as not to jeopardize the needs of future generations.

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À propos de l'auteur (2007)

Neil Carter is Senior Lecturer in the Department of Politics at the University of York. He is co-author of How Organisations Measure Success: The Use of Performance Indicators in Government (with Rudolf Klein and Patricia Day, 1992) and joint editor of the journal Environmental Politics.

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