Ballads from Manuscripts, Volume 1

Couverture
Frederick James Furnivall, William Richard Morfill
Ballad society, 1872
0 Avis
 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Aucun commentaire n'a été trouvé aux emplacements habituels.

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 346 - Nay then, farewell ! I have touch'd the highest point of all my greatness : And, from that full meridian of my glory, I haste now to my setting. I shall fall Like a bright exhalation in the evening, And no man see me more.
Page 321 - For this commonly giveth in four, often seven, sometime nine, sometime eleven, and sometime fourteen days, respite to whom it vexeth. But that immediately killed some in opening their windows, some in playing with children in their street doors ; some in one hour, many in two, it destroyed ; and, at the longest, to them that merrily dined it gave a sorrowful supper.
Page 114 - too much ' cometh this monstrous and portentous dearth made by man, notwithstanding God doth send us plentifully the fruits of the earth, mercifully, contrary unto our deserts ; notwithstanding, too much, which these rich men have, causeth such dearth that poor men which live of their labour cannot with the sweat of their face have a living, all kind of victuals is so dear — pigs, geese, capons, chickens, eggs, etc.
Page 4 - The increase of pasture,' said I, 'by which your sheep, which are naturally mild, and easily kept in order, may be said now to devour men and unpeople, not only villages, but towns; for wherever it is found that the sheep of any soil yield a softer and richer wool than ordinary, there the nobility and gentry, and even those holy men, the dobots!
Page 114 - ... that I will speak that their matters may be heard. I trouble my lord of Canterbury : and being at his house, now and then I walk in the garden, looking in my book, as I can do but little good at it. But something I must needs do to satisfy this place.
Page 4 - ... doors grow keen, they rob no less keenly ; and what else can they do ? For when, by wandering about, they have worn out both their health and their clothes, and are tattered, and look ghastly, men of quality will not entertain them, and poor men dare not do it, knowing that one who has been bred up in idleness and pleasure, and who was used to walk about with his sword and buckler, despising all the...
Page 372 - When she was thus brought to the high place made in the middest of the church, betweene the queere and the high altar, she was set in a rich chaire. And after that she had rested a while, she descended downe to the high altar and there prostrate hir selfe while the archbishop of...
Page 168 - The Cardinals he denounces with the same indignant scorn ; but chiefly the Cardinal Legate whom he has seen in England riding in his pride and pomp, with lewdness, rapacity, merciless extortion, insolence in his train. Above all, his hatred (it might seem that on this all honest English indignation was agreed) is against the mendicant orders. Of the older monks there is almost total silence. For St. Benedict, for St. Dominic, for St. Francis he has the profoundest reverence.
Page 4 - ... predecessor did. Now, when the stomachs of those that are thus turned out of doors grow keen, they rob no less keenly; and what else can they do? For when, by wandering about, they have worn out both their health and their clothes, and are tattered, and look ghastly, men of quality will not entertain them, and poor men dare not do it, knowing that one who has been bred up...

Informations bibliographiques