La Llorona's Children: Religion, Life, and Death in the U.S.–Mexican Borderlands

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University of California Press, 29 avr. 2004 - 331 pages
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Luis D. León's compelling, innovative exploration of religion in the U.S.-Mexican borderlands issues a fundamental challenge to current scholarship in the field and recharts the landscape of Chicano faith. La Llorona's Children constructs genealogies of the major traditions spanning Mexico City, East Los Angeles, and the southwestern United States: Guadalupe devotion, curanderismo, espiritualismo, and evangelical/ Pentecostal traditions. León theorizes a religious poetics that functions as an effective and subversive survival tactic akin to crossing the U.S.-Mexican border. He claims that, when examined in terms of broad categorical religious forms and intentions, these traditions are remarkably alike and resonate religious ideas and practices developed in the ancient Mesoamerican world.

León proposes what he calls a borderlands reading of La Virgen de Guadalupe as a transgressive, border-crossing goddess in her own right, a mestiza deity who displaces Jesus and God for believers on both sides of the border. His energetic discussion of curanderismo shows how this indigenous religious practice links cognition and sensation in a fresh and powerful technology of the body—one where sensual, erotic, and sexualized ways of knowing emphasize personal and communal healing. La Llorona’s Children ends with a fascinating study of the rich and complex world of Chicano/a Pentecostalism in Los Angeles, a tradition that León maintains allows Chicano men to reimagine their bodies into a unified social body through ritual performance. Throughout the narrative, the connections among sacred spaces, saints, healers, writers, ideas, and movements are woven with skill, inspiration, and insight.
 

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Table des matières

Preface
vii
In Search of La Lloronas Children Reimagining Religion
1
The Terror of Postcolonial History Eternal Returns in the Borderlands
23
Virtual Virgin Nation Mexico City as sacred Center of Memory
59
Religious Transnationalism A Mexican Virgin in LA
91
El Don The Gift of Healing from Mesoamerica to the Borderlands
128
Diaspora Spirits From the Virgin City to the City of Angels
163
Born Again in East LA and Beyond
201
Fin de Siglo in the Borderlands So Far from God So Close to the United States
241
Notes
269
Index
307
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À propos de l'auteur (2004)

Luis D. Leon is visiting assistant professor in Ethnic Studies and Religious Studies at the University of California, Berkeley.

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