Account of Koonawur, in the Himalaya: Etc. Etc. Etc

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J. Madden, 1841 - 308 pages
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Page 34 - ... or ribs, one or two feet apart. The side ropes are at a most inconvenient distance from each other ; and in one place they are so far asunder, that a person cannot reach both with his extended arms. The ropes, from being constructed of such frail materials, do not bear much stretching, and the bridge forms a curve the sixth part of a circle. Frequent accidents have occurred...
Page 41 - ... perpendicular face of a mountain, formed of horizontal stakes driven into the crevices, with boards above, and the outer ends resting on trees or slanting posts projecting from the clefts of the rock below. The most extraordinary one of this kind I ever saw was in the valley of Teedong. It is called Rapua, and the scaffolding continued for 150 feet. It was constructed like the other, with this difference, that six posts were driven horizontally into the cracks of the rocks, and secured by a great...
Page 128 - Oochen character. These, I was informed, were brought from Lahassa, and cost 500 rupees. At stated periods the Gelongs and Lamas assemble to read them ; and on grand days there is exhibited an iron stand of five squares one above the other, tapering to the top, which is illuminated with one hundred and eight brass lamps, and is made to revolve in the same direction as Jhe cylinders.
Page 284 - ... quartz or bone ; they have also knives in brass or silver cases : all carry iron-pipes of the same shape as those used by labourers at home, and the higher classes have them generally ornamented with silver. In common with the inhabitants of Koonawur, the greater part of them have a flint and piece of steel for striking fire, attached to their apparel by a metal chain. The women, whose dress resembles that of the men, were literally groaning under a load of ornaments, which are mostly of iron...
Page 39 - The roads in general," he says, "consist of narrow footpaths skirting precipices, with often here and there rocks, that would seem to come down with a puff of wind, projecting over the head ; to avoid which it is necessary sometimes to bend yourself double. The way often leads over smooth stones steeply inclined to a frightful abyss, with small niches cut or worn, barely sufficient to admit the point of the foot ; or it lies upon heaps of gigantic angular fragments of granite or gneiss, almost piercing...
Page 34 - These are placed close together, and above is half a i) hollow piece of fir tree, secured by pegs driven through below ; from this hangs a loop of three or four ropes, which serves as a seat for passengers, and also as a receptacle for baggage. This block is pulled across by two pieces of twine, and the conveyance is pretty safe, but greatly alarming to a person unused to it, as the stream rushes with frightful rapidity beneath. The longest bridge of this kind I crossed was under Rampoor, where the...
Page 40 - ... the foot ; or it lies upon heaps of gigantic angular fragments of granite or gneiss, almost piercing the shoes, and piled upon one another in the most horrid disorder. Where the rocks are constantly hurled from above there is not the slightest trace of a path, and cairns of stones are erected within sight of each other, to guide the traveller. There are often deep chasms between the rocks, and it requires a considerable degree of agility to clear them, and no small degree of caution to avoid...
Page 286 - We exchanged a gold button for a goat, which we took with us to Soobathoo. The wool is extremely fine, and almost equal to what is used for the manufacture of shawls.
Page 125 - ... human scull, out of which he appears to be drinking, and in the other is a large scorpion. Round his body are tied a number of earthen balls representing sculls, and altogether he has a most horrid appearance. .In the right-hand room is a gigantic figure at least twelve feet high, called Shikja Thooba. His countenance is mild and placid, and before him are several brass cups with fruit and water. In the left-hand room is a whirligig seven or eight feet high, decorated with silk hangings and scarfs....
Page 35 - ... and the bridge forms a curve the sixth part of a circle. Frequent accidents have occurred here ; and only a month before I crossed, in August last, two people were lost by one of the side ropes giving way. The guides that accompanied me did not tell me of this, until they saw ten or twelve of my 34 loaded followers upon the bridge at once.

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