Johnsonian Miscellanies, Volume 1

Couverture
George Birkbeck Norman Hill
At the Clarendon Press, 1897 - 517 pages
 

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Page 192 - Now o'er the one half-world Nature seems dead, and wicked dreams abuse The curtain'd sleep ; now witchcraft celebrates Pale Hecate's offerings, and wither'd murder, Alarum'd by his sentinel, the wolf. Whose howl 's his watch, thus with his stealthy pace, With Tarquin's ravishing strides, towards his design Moves like a ghost.
Page 457 - For many years, when he was not disposed to enter into the conversation going forward, whoever sat near his chair, might hear him repeating, from Shakspeare, Ay, but to die and go we know not where ; To lie in cold obstruction and to rot ; This sensible warm motion to become A kneaded clod, and the delighted spirit To bathe in fiery floods 5
Page 202 - and England did adorn ; The first in loftiness of thought surpast, The next in majesty ; in both the last. The force of Nature could no further go, To make a third she join'd the former two. One evening in the oratorio
Page 261 - eating with uncommon satisfaction. "Some people (said he,) have a foolish way of not minding, or pretending not to mind, what they eat. For my part, I mind my belly very studiously, and very carefully ; for I look upon it, that he who does not mind his belly will hardly mind anything else.
Page 436 - An allowance made to any one without an equivalent. In England it is generally understood to mean pay given to a state hireling for treason to his country.' Pensioner. ' One who is supported by an allowance paid at the will of another; a dependant.
Page 312 - If there be any of you who by this means cannot quiet his own conscience herein, but requireth further comfort or counsel, let him come to me, or to some other discreet and learned Minister of God's Word, and open his grief.
Page 332 - 1 did not think he ought to be shut up. His infirmities were not noxious to society. He insisted on people praying with him ; and I'd as lief pray with Kit Smart as any one else. Another charge was, that he did not love clean linen ; and I have no passion for it.
Page 326 - has mazed his imagination in following the phantoms which other writers raise up before him may here be cured of his delirious extasies by reading human sentiments in human language ; by scenes from which a hermit may estimate the transactions of the world, and a confessor predict the progress of the passions.
Page 199 - these verses to imitate such a one, naming him : Hermit hoar, in solemn cell, Wearing out life's evening gray; Strike thy bosom, sage! and tell What is bliss, and which the way? Thus I spoke, and speaking sigh'd, Scarce repress'd the starting tear, When the hoary Sage reply'd, Come, my lad, and drink some beer
Page 410 - on this part of my work with pleasure, which no [blame or praise of] man shall diminish or augment. I shall never envy the honours which wit and learning obtain in any other cause, if I can be numbered among the writers who have given ardour to virtue, and confidence to truth. 1 The

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