The Geology of Rutland and the Parts of Lincoln, Leicester, Northhampton, Huntingdon, and Cambridge, Included in Sheet 64 of the One-inch Map of the Geological Survey: With an Introductory Essay on the Classification and Correlation of the Jurassic Rocks of the Midland District of England

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H. M. Stationery Office, Longmans & Company, E. Stanford, 1875 - 320 pages
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Page 295 - The Natural, Experimental, and Medicinal History of the Mineral Waters of Derbyshire, Lincolnshire, and Yorkshire...
Page 6 - Christmas, or to our hearts; or to both. In order to be convinced of this it is only necessary to compare the present with the past. In the old days of not so long ago the festival began to excite us in November. For weeks the house rustled with charming and thrilling secrets, and with the furtive noises of paper parcels being wrapped and unwrapped; the house was a whispering gallery. The tension of expectancy...
Page 136 - England, and at a period separated by a long interval of time from that of the last deposit in the area, the Upper Lias Clay, that a number of considerable rivers, flowing through the Palaeozoic district lying to the north-west, formed a great delta. Within the area of this delta the usual alternations of marine, brackish-water, and terrestrial conditions occurred, and more or less irregular accumulations of sand or mud, in strata of small horizontal extent, took place. Subsequently, and probably...
Page 237 - Clay was formerly largely dug and burnt as a substitute for gravel, a use to which the clays of this formation are frequently applied. At Ramsey Heights there are several brickyards...
Page 136 - We find in what is now the midland district of England, and at a period separated by a long interval of time from that of the last deposit in the area, the Upper Lias Clay, that a number of considerable rivers, flowing through the Palaeozoic district lying to the north-west, formed a great delta. Within the area of this delta the usual alternations of marine, brackish water, and terrestrial conditions occurred, and more or less irregular accumulations of sand or mud in strata of small horizontal...
Page 143 - Sowerbyi), local depression took place within an area having a diameter of something like 90 miles, the amount of depression being greatest within its centre. As a consequence of this local depression there was slowly accumulated, by the growth of coral reefs, and the action of marine currents sweeping small shells and their fragments along the sea-bottom, a mass of calcareous strata, presenting many variations in its local characters, and constituting...
Page 30 - ... few inches in thickness. It has consequently been found impracticable in this district to draw a line of boundary between the representatives of the Great and Inferior Oolite. Thus it has arisen that under the term " Northampton Sand " are included, in North Oxfordshire and South Northamptonshire, the whole mass of variable sandy strata, (passing at some points into imperfect ironstones, and at others into impure limestones,) which intervene between the Upper Lias Clay and the marly limestones...
Page 295 - An essay Towards a Natural, Experimental, and Medicinal History of the Principle Mineral Waters of ...... Northamptonshire, Leicestershire, and Nottinghamshire, Particularly those of Nevile Holt &e. 4to. Sheffield. 6. ______ Natural, Experimental, and Medicinal History of the Mineral Waters of England.
Page 180 - Ancaster, such as Newark and Grantham churches and other edifices in various parts of Lincolnshire, have scarcely yielded to the effects of atmospheric influences.
Page 183 - The slates are cleaved at any time after they are frosted. Three kinds of tools are used by the Collyweston slaters. The " cliving hammer," a heavy hammer with broad chisel-edge for splitting up the frosted blocks. The "batting hammer" or "dressinghammer," a lighter tool for trimming the surfaces of the slates and chipping them to the required form and size. The " bill and helve," the former consisting of an old file sharpened and inserted into the latter in a very primitive manner.

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