Nash's Pall Mall Magazine, Volume 3

Couverture
1894

À l'intérieur du livre

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Aucun commentaire n'a été trouvé aux emplacements habituels.

Autres éditions - Tout afficher

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 350 - But for those first affections, Those shadowy recollections, Which, be they what they may, Are yet the fountain-light of all our day, Are yet a master-light of all our seeing; Uphold us, cherish, and have power to make Our noisy years seem moments in the being Of the eternal silence...
Page 715 - Our delight in the sunshine on the deep-bladed grass to-day might be no more than the faint perception of wearied souls, if it were not for the sunshine and the grass in the far-off years which still live in us, and transform our perception into love.
Page 713 - And one, an English home— gray twilight pour'd On dewy pastures, dewy trees, Softer than sleep — all things in order stored, A haunt of ancient Peace.
Page 549 - Last night, her lord was all that's good and great: A knave this morning, and his will a cheat. Strange! by the means defeated of the ends, By spirit robb'd of power, by warmth of friends, By wealth of followers!
Page 327 - Behold, we know not anything; I can but trust that good shall fall At last — far off — at last, to all, And every winter change to spring.
Page 127 - I've done my share of toil, And life is short — the longest life a span; I care not now to tarry for the corn or for the oil, Or for the wine that maketh glad the heart of man. For good undone and gifts misspent and resolutions -vain Tis somewhat late to trouble. This I know — I should live the same life over, if I had to live again, And the chances are I go where most men go.
Page 688 - God hath numbered thy kingdom, and finished it. ... Thou art weighed in the balances and art found wanting. . . . Thy kingdom is divided, and given to the Medes and Persians.
Page 176 - Wellington is supposed to have said that the Battle of Waterloo was won on the playing fields of Eton.
Page 297 - Justice ; and a woman bringing him less than his due, she must be a creature of the slime ! This was the shadowy sentiment that made the wall of division between them. There was no other. Lord Ormont had struck to fragments that barrier of the conventional oath and ceremonial union. He was unjust — he was Injustice. The weak may be wedded, they cannot be married, to Injustice. And if we have the world for the buttress of injustice, then is Nature the flaring rebel ; there is no fixed order possible....
Page 350 - I remember the black wharves and the slips, And the sea-tides tossing free; And Spanish sailors with bearded lips, And the beauty and mystery of the ships, And the magic of the sea. And the voice of that wayward song Is singing and saying still: "A boy's will is the wind's will, And the thoughts of youth are long, long thoughts.

Informations bibliographiques