Interpreting Amida: History and Orientalism in the Study of Pure Land Buddhism

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SUNY Press, 25 avr. 1997 - 248 pages
Pure Land Buddhism was the largest traditional religion in Japan. It had an enormous impact on Japanese culture and was among the first forms of Buddhism encountered by Western culture. Not only has it been neglected in modern descriptions of Japan, but it also has been relatively ignored by Buddhist studies. The author shows that Pure Land Buddhism, despite a Mahayana Buddhist philosophical basis, has paralleled the social and political qualities associated with the Judeo-Christian tradition. It has variously been threatening to mainstream Westerners, uninteresting to Westerners seeking the exotic, and disagreeable to cultural brokers on all sides who want to depict Japanese culture as radically opposed to the West. The faulty appreciation of Pure Land Buddhism is one of the leading world examples of a counterproductive orientalism that restricts rather than improves cross-cultural communication.
 

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Table des matières

Background Pure Land Buddhism from India to the Modern Period
1
Modernization
25
Interpreting Pure Land Buddhism before the Nineteenth Century
43
Interpreting Pure Land from the 1870s through World War II
55
Interpreting Pure Land in the Postwar Period
83
Interpreting Pure Land in the Future A Concluding Prognosis
103
Other Missionaries and Outside Observers Reports on Shin in the Late Nineteenth and Twentieth Centuries
123
NOTES
141
BIBLIOGRAPHY
209
INDEX
241
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À propos de l'auteur (1997)

Galen Amstutz is Coordinator of the Edwin O. Reischauer Institute of Japanese Studies at Harvard University.

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