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will in future be granted to any member nation of the pure, unadulterated Gospe who is in arrear for two years' subscription, Jesus Christ, and lim crucified. or the amount of five pounds for books. We now coine to the account of the

In this Report are inserted the resolutions ciety's Protestant Mission in the East Ind on the subject of auxiliary societies, to buy for the year 1809. formed in the different dioceses throughout The Rev. Mr. Pæzold having written t the kingdom, to which we gave currency in the spirit of refractoriness and disorder wl our number for May 1810 (p. 393). We hope had appeared in the Malabar congregati the plan may have been found successful. at Vepery had been in part subdued The expenditure of the Society, from the me

means of the Secretary's letter in the na 13th April 1809, to March 29, 1810, of the Society, but that a few still continu amounts to about 16,000l. Of this sum, refractory; the Society intimated to about 12,4001. have been paid for books, &c. Pæzold, in reply, that the ancient rules of t including the Welsh Scriptures, the Manks mission ought to be observed as strictly Common Prayer, and some prayer books possible, and that the government of t for the Danish prisoners in Great Britain. The country, they trusted, would protect their mi expense of the East India mission is 1,2081. sionaries from disturbance. This the gover and of the Scilly Inission, 3871. Upwards of ment had shewn itself willing to do. Fro 700l. more are expended in different chari- a subsequent account it appears that thing table purposes ; and the remainder in sa

were more quiet. laries to officers, and various contingent ex- Mr. Pæzold, in January 1809, visited the penses. The receipts are

to a similar Christians at Pullicat, to whom he preache amount, and consist of, benefactions and le- several times. He administered the Lord gacies, 1,1771.- subscriptions from members Supper tothirty-nine Portuguese and twenty3,033-receipts for books, &c. 6,2301. (be- three Malabar Christians, and baptizesides 5,000l. of arrears still due)-dividends twenty-three children. He also visited an of various funds, of wbich 646l. are specie consoled the aged and infirm. In Februar fically for the East India missions, about he went to St. Thomas's Mount, and on bi 5,1001. The remainder consists of a re- arrival found all the good people assemble mission of the Income tax, 308l. and the pro- to hear the Gospel preached to them in their duce of an estate, 168l. The account of the own language. Two Roman Catholics were society's funds is followed by a statement, received into the congregation, and sever. which has also been separately circulated, heathens were publicly examined and bapwith a view to repel a prevalent opinion tized, who had been under instruction the that the income of the Society exceeds its some tinue. Before he departed, the people annual expenditure, and is in an accumulating gave him the contents of their alms-bos, state, and to prevent the donations which about nine pagodas, for their poor fellow would otherwise be made to them from being Christians at Pullicat; and though poot diverted into other channels. So far is this themselves, they promised, should God bless opinion from being correct, that in the year their undertakings, tu continue their weekly ending April 1809, it was necessary to sell collections for the same purpose.

Mr. 1,765l. three per cent, stock to meet the ex- Pæzold has sent extracts from his diary, froma cess of their expenditure over their income; which it appears, that the religious duties of and at the last audit a sum of 3,0201. re- the mission had been regularly performed by mained due to the bookseller and printer, himself, in conjunction with the catechists which was orer and above the amount of their and schoolmasters. The number of comreceipts for the year. The Board, however, municants in the native congregations on trust, that that gracious Providence, which Easter day, was nearly 200, who were all for more than a century past has enabled quiet and peaceable Christians. them to carry on their designs for promoting The Rev. Mr. Holzberg writes from Cad. Christian knowledge, and editying the body dalore, that his labours in the mission bave of Christ, will still furnish the means by been uninterrupted. In both the English - which these objects may be pursued with in- and Malabar congregations wany have beard creased activity and vigour." We very sin. the word profitably. His school, consisting cerely hope that this may be the case, and of twenty children, was under the care of that the Society for promoting Christian

a very able and worthy schoolinaster, called Knowledge, laying aside all prejudice and Pitshey-Matton, who had been recommended partial affection, will devote itself with by Mr. Kolhoff, of Tanjore. In 1806, he had energy and simplicity to the one great object baptized nineteen children and six adults: af its institution, the universal dissemi- the communicants were eighty-two.

17 be bad baptized four children, and A strict order had been given, by a late exthree adalts: the communicants were ninety- cellent collector, that no Christian should be eight. In 1808 be had baptized fourteen obliged to work on Sundays; but this order, children and fine converts: the communi- it seerns, is not enforced. cants were 102. He had dispersed books' Buddaloor was the very place where the and tracts in great numbers.

late Mr. Swartz was robbed of his gold stockThe Rer. Mr. Puhle writes from Trichina- buckle. At that time there was not a single pely, expressing his great satisfaction in Christian there, but now there is a great the appointment of Mr. Horst one of the number, as may be seen by the account of Seciay's missionaries. He observes, that in this mission for 1794. consequence of the age and infirmities of the The increase of the Tanjore congregation country priest, Sattianaden, and of the state is stated to be 35, viz. 2 Hindroos of high cast, of the southern congregation, ideas were en- 4 persons of the Kalla cast, 5 of the Palla tertained of ordaming, according to the rites cast, 15 Pariars, and 9 Papists. The comof the Latheran church, two or three of the municants wete 253. ftest catechists, that they may administer to The Danish Missionaries at Tranquebat the Taajore and southern congregations. had been put to great inconvenience by the

The Rev. Messrs. Kolhoff and Horst, the interraption of their usual supplies from masiosaries at Tanjore, speak of a Brahmin Copenhagen, and had applied to the goof abuse conversion to Christianity they had vernment of Madras for protection and good hopes. This Brahmin was willing to support, their pecuniary difficulties baving be employed in any situation in the mission, obliged them to lessen the number of their beat the income of the Tanjore mission being children and to postpone many urgent ore already inadequate to their most necessary jects. Their congregation, however, in the disbursements, the missionaries were under midst of these disadvantages, bad enjoyed the painful necessity of directing him to the means of grace, and had had an increase kokeat for assistance from the missions on of sixty-four children, born of Christian pathe coas. A great part of the revenues of rents, and fourteen adults, who had quitted the country were formerly allotted, by the heathenism, and accepted the saving Gospel Hiadoa kings, to the support of heathen of Christ; among these was a Mahrattian tuples and Brahmins; and this appropria- Brahmin, who spoke the Telinga language, tion is continued by the British government, and who had become, not only a theoretical, Whea a Brahmin, therefore, resolves to em but a real and practical Christian, in which brace Christianity, he not only draws on character he continued to persevere. Their himself the indignation of lús order, and of conmunicants were 1048. Mr. John, the all other Hindoos, but furfeits all the privi- missionary, bad lost his sight so as to be leges and emoluments he formerly enjoyed. unable to read and write ; as had the assisOf course he has none to look up io, for assis. tant, Mr Schreyfoget. In this state of afflictante in obtaining a livelihood, but to Chris- tion, the faithfal senior catechist Saroiragen,

and the other catechists in the Tranquebar The native fellow-labourers had continued district, had afforded them much comfort to assist Messrs. Kolhoff and Horst in preach. and assistance. The government of Madras ing the word of God to Christians and hea- had advanced, for the use of the mission, 200 thens, and had visited the country congrega- pagodas a month, which was, however, much ticas in a variety of places, exhurting them less than its necessities required. 10 live as became Christians. Sattiana- From the letters of Messrs. Kolhoff and den had been eroployed in dispensing the Horst is given a long extract, in which these Sacraments in various places. They com- gentlemen courment with muels feeling on plain much of the want of more Malabar Bi- certain passages in the fiticenth number of bles and Testaments in all the congregations; the transactions of the London Missionary and they state that great pains had been Society, which they understand to reflect on taken to inure the children under their care their conduct and that of their predecessors te habits of profitable industry. They men

in the mission, more particularly as having tips the real shewn by several members of made an unwarrantable compromise of printhe ssngregation at Buddaloor to act accord ciple, in the judulgence shewn to their cone ing to their Christian engagements. The

veris on the subject of Cast. Messrs. Craio Christinas

, it appears, have been often pre and Desgranges, in their Journal of the 5th Feated, by the heathen civil servants of the of March 1805, soon after they had arrived Censpany

, froin attending public worship on in India, observe, “ Our two lads” (CbrisSundays

, being called to work on that day. tian lads, we presume) are sick, but they

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will in future be granted to any member nation of the pure, unadulterated Gospel of who is in arrear for two years' subscription, Jesus Christ, and him crucified. or the amount of five pounds for books. We now coine to the account of the So

In this Report are inserted the resolutions ciety's Protestant Mission in the East Indies, on the subject of auxiliary societies, to be for the year 1809. formed in the different dioceses throughout The Rev. Mr. Pæzold having written that the kingdom, to which we gave currency in the spirit of refractoriness and disorder which our number fur May 1810 (p. 393). We hope had appeared in the Malabar congregation the plan may have been found successful. at Vepery had been in part subdued by

The expenditure of the Society, from the means of the Secretary's letter in the name 13th April 1809, to March 29, 1810, of the Society, but that a few still continued amounts to about 16,000l. Of this sum, refractory; the Society intimated to Mr. about 12,4001, have been paid for books,&c. Pæzold, in reply, that the ancient rules of the including the Welsh Scriptures, the Manks mission ought to be observed as strictly as Common Prayer, and some prayer books possible, and that the government of the for the Danish prisoners in Great Britain. The country, they trusted, would protect their misexpense of the East India mission is 1,2081. sionaries from disturbance. This the governand of the Scilly mission, 3871. Upwards of ment had shewn itself willing to do. From 7001. more are expended in different chari. a subsequent account it appears that things table purposes; and the remainder in sa- were more quiet. laries to officers, and various contingent cx- Mr. Pæzold, in January 1809, visited the penses. The receipts are to a similar Christians at Pullicat, to whom he preached amount, and consist of, benefactions and le- several times. He administered the Lord's gacies, 1,177.--subscriptions from members Supper tothirty-nine Portuguese and twenty, 3,0331.--receipts for books, &c. 6,2301. (be- three Malabar Christians, and baptized ,sides 5,000l. of arrears still due)-dividends twenty-three children. He also visited and of various funds, of wbich 6461. are speci- consoled the aged and infirm. In February fically for the East India missions, about he went to St. Thonias's Mount, and on his 5,1001. The remainder consists of a re- arrival found all the good people assembled mission of the Income tax, 308l. and the pro- to hear the Gospel preached to them in their duce of an eslate, 168l. The account of the own language. Two Roman Catholics were society's funds is followed a statement, received into the congregation, and seven which has also been separately circulated, heathens were publicly examined and bapwith a view to repel a prevalent opinion tized, who had been under instruction for that the income of the Society exceeds its some time. Before he departed, the people annual expenditure, and is in an accumulating gave him the contents of their alms-bos, state, and to prevent the donations which about nine pagodas, for their poor fellow would otherwise be made to them from being Christians at Pullicat; and though poor diverted into other channels. So far is this themselves, they promised, should God bless opinion from being correct, that in the year their undertakings, to continue their weekly ending April 1809, it was necessary to sell collections for the same purpose. Mr. 1,7651. three per cent. stock to meet the ex- Pæzold has sent extracts from his diary, from cess of their expenditure over their income; which it appears, that the religious duties of - and at the last audit a sum of 3,0201. re- the mission had been regularly performed by mained due to the bookseller and printer, himself, in conjunction with the catechists which was over and above the amount of their and schoolmasters. The number of comreceipts for the year. The Board, bowever, muvicants in the native congregations on trust,“ that that gracious Providence, which Easter day, was nearly 200, who were all for more than a century past has enabled quiet and peaceable Christians. them to carry on their designs for promoting The Rev. Mr. Holzberg writes from Cude Christian knowledge, and editying the body dalore, that his labours in the mission have of Christ, will still furnish the means by been uninterrupted. In botls the English - which these objects may be pursued with in- and Malabar congregations wany have heard creased activity and vigour.” We very sin. the word profitably. His school, consisting cerely hope that this may be the case, and of twenty children, was under the care of that the Society for promoting Christian

a very able and worthy schoolinaster, called Knowledge, laying aside all prejudice and Pitshey-Matton, who had been recommended partial affection, will devote itself with by Mr. Kolhoff, of Tanjore. In 1806, he had energy and simplicity to the one great object baptized nineteen children and six adults : of its institution,—the universal dissemi- the communicants were eighty-two. h

1807 be bad baptized four children, and A strict order had been given, by a late exthree adalts: the communicants were ninety- cellent collector, that no Christian should be eight. In 1808 he had baptized fourteen obliged to work on Sundays; but this order, children and nine converts: the communi- it seerns, is not enforced. cants were 102. He had dispersed books Buddaloor was the very place where the and tracts in great autenbers.

late Mr. Swartz was robbed of his gold stockThe Rev. Mr. Pohle writes from Trichina- buckle. At that time there was not a single poly, expressing his great satisfaction in Christian there, but now there is a great the appointment of Mr. Horst one of the number, as may be seen by the account of Society's missionaries. He observes, that in this mission for 1794. consequence of the age and informities of the The increase of the Tanjore congregation country priest, Sattianaden, and of the state is stated to be 35, viz. 2 Hindoos of high cast, of the southern congregation, ideas were en- 4 persons of the Kalla cast, 5 of the Palla tertained of ordaining, according to the rites cast, 15 Pariars, and 9 Papists. The comof the Latheran church, two or three of the municants wete 253. éttest catechists, that they may administer to The Danish Missionaries at Tranquebat the Tanjore and southern congregations. had been put to great inconvenience by the

The Rev. Alessrs. Kolhoff and Horst, the interraption of their usual supplies froin missionaries at Tanjore, speak of a Brahmin Copenhagen, and had applied to the goof whose conversion to Christianity they had vernment of Madras for protection and good hopes. This Bralimin was willing to support, their pecuniary difficulties baving be employed in any situation in the mission, obliged them to lessen the number of their but the income of the Tanjore mission being children and to post pone many urgent oto already inadequate to their most necessary jects. Their congregation, however, in the disbursements, the missionaries were under midst of these disadvantages, krad enjoyed Itse painful necessity of directing him to the means of grace, and had had an increase look eat for assistance from the nuissions on of sixty-foor children, born of Christian pathe coast. A great part of the revenues of rents, and fourteen adults, who had quitted Ibe country were formerly allotted, by the heathenism, and accepted the saving Gospel Hindoo kings, to the support of heat ben of Christ; among these was a Mahrattian tesaples and Brahmins ; and this appropria. Brahmin, who spoke the Telinga language, tion is continged by the British government, and who had become, not only a theoretical, When a Brahmin, therefore, resolves to em- but a real and practical Christian, in which brace Christianity, he not only draws on character he continued to persevere. Their bimself the indignation of his order, and of communicants were 1048. Mr. John, the all other Hindoos, but forfeits all the privi- missionary, bad lost his sight so as to be ·leges and emoluments he formerly enjoyed. unable to read and write ; as had the assisOf course he has none to look up to, for assis. tant, Mr Schreyfogel. In this state of afilictance is obtaming a livelihood, but to Chris- tion, the faithful senior catechist Saroiragen, tinas.

and the other catechists in the Tranquebar The native fellow-labourers had continued district, had afforded them much comfort to assist Messrs. Kolhoff and Horst in preach. and assistance. The government of Madras ing the word of God to Christians and hea- had advanced, for the use of the mission, 200 thens, and had visited the country congrega- pagodas a month, which was, however, much tists in a variety of places, exhurting them less than its necessities required. to live as became Christians. Sattiana- From the letters of Messrs. Kolhoff and den had been employed in dispensing the Horst is given a long extract, in which these bacruments in various places. They com- gentlemen comment will much feeling on plain much of the want of more Malabar Bi- certain passages in the fifteenth number of bles and Testaments in all the congregations; the transactions of the London Missionary and they state that great pains had been Society, which they understaud to reflect on taken to inure the children under their care their conduct and that of Their predecessors w babits of profitable industry. They men- in the mission, more particularly as having tion the real shewn by several members of made an unwarrantable compromise of prine the congregation at Buddeloor to act accord. ciple, in the judulgence siewn to their consing to their Christian engagements. The veris on the subject of Cast. Messrs. Crana Christiais, it appears, have been often pre- and Desgranges, in their Journal of the 5th sented, by the heathen civil servants of the of March 1805, soon after they had arrived Company, froin attending public worship on in India, observe, “ Our two lads” (CbrisSundays, being called to work on that day. tian lads, we presuide) “ are sick, but tiwy

will eat nothing which our cook dresses, as unscriptural surrender of their birthrigh he is of the Pariar cast. Is it not the duty which no nobleman or gentleman in our of Missionaries to adopt some plan for abo- country, would ever submit. lishing the cast among their converts? If “ As we presume that the equity of su we were to tolerate it, we should soon have demand cannot be proved by any precep wonderful accounts to transmit to our friends the sacred oracles, nor from the practic in Europe of our success: but the Scriptures the apostles and primitive Christians, an must be our guide." The defence of Messrs. besides such a demand might be produc Kolhoff and Horst, to the charge which they of fatal consequences, we have taken car conceive to be insinuated in this passage, is follow the same mode of acting as our pre as follows.

cessors have done, with regard to this Bri “ From the commencement of the mission min. We were, lowever, much pleased on this coast, it has been the uniform prac- learning that he had made no objecti tice of all the Missionaries to instruct the against vegetable food, prepared at his converts from heathenism in the truths of quest by a Wellaler, who, though of a h Christianity, to insist upon their leading an cast, are inferior to that of the Braming.holy life, and shewing that they are Chris- Messrs. Kolloff and Horst likewise adve tians, by loving God above all things, by to two other passages in the same number considering all men of whatever denomina- the Missionary Transactions, wbich they co tion, religion, or cast, as their neighbours; sider as leveiled both at them and at t to entertain a hearty good will towards them, chaplains of the East India Company. " IL and to do them all the good in their power; have reason to believe," say Messrs. Cra but, never did they insist on any person who and Desgranges, " that there are man wished to embrace Christianity, to renounce friends in this place who will gladly assi his cast.

and protect missionaries who are truly devot “ To desire a man to renounce his casted to the work.” May God incline the signifies, to require (for example) a man of heart of one of our directors,” they say i the high Seyva, or Wellaler cast, who is ac- another place, " or of sone experienced mi customed from bis infancy to live only upon nister” (we copy their Italics) “ to come and vegetables, to eat meat, to enter into a close preach in English, and erect the Gospel connection, or to level bimself, with the lower standard here." classes, and to intermarry with one another Now we thiuk that the first and the last (e. g.) with the Pariars, a cast, whn, from of these remarks (we see nothing objectiontime immemorial, have made themselves dis- able in the second) are very silly, and, pergustful to all other classes of the natives, by haps, a little “ conceited ;" but they might their inattention to, and disregard of cleanli. have passed in a private communication. ness, and particularly by feeding upon car- We think it much more inexcusable in rion. And although our Protestant Pariars the Directors of the Missionary Society are not allowed to use such detestable food; to have published them to the world. At yet as their heathen and Romish relations the same time we think that no one who are not debarred the use of it in like man- reads them will think that they deserved a ner, the aversion of well-bred persons to en

grave and scrious refutation from Messrs. ter into the closest connections with such a Kolhoff and Horst, or that it was consistent class of people, (at least until every vestige with the accustomed reserve and dignity of of such filthy propensities shall have been

the Society for promoting Christian Knoweffaced) is founded upon reason and de- ledge to niake tbem selves a party in the disa cency; and we do not feel ourselves war.

pute. ranted to require of the biglier ranks such an

VIEW OF PUBLIC AFFAIRS.

FOREIGN INTELLIGENCE. No action has as yet taken place in Por

tugal. The hostile armies occupy the same Our limits impose upon us the necessity of position which they did at the close of the being very concise in our view of public last month. Massena is said to have reaffairs. We can do no more than hastilyceived reinforcements to the amount of 16 glauce at the occurrences of the mouth. or 17 thousand men, which proves his comia

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