The American Negro Soldier with the Red Hand of France

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Cornhill Company, 1920 - 180 pages
 

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Page 114 - No Man's Land" and join the bunch that's taking it easy there waiting to be exchanged and taken home. There is no disgrace in that. That bunch of American prisoners will be welcomed just as warmly as you who stick it out in these infernal trenches. Get wise and get over the top. There is nothing in the glory of keeping up the war.
Page 114 - ... have to pay; the longer the war lasts the larger those taxes at home will be. Get wise and get over. All the fine words about glory are tommy rot. You haven't got any business fighting in France. You would better be fighting the money trust at home instead of fighting your fellow soldiers in grey over here where it doesn't really matter two sticks to you how the war goes. "Your country needs you, your family needs you and you need your life for something better than being gassed, shot at, deafened...
Page 114 - Do your part to put an end to the war. Put an end to your part of it. Stop fighting. That's the simplest way. You can do it, you soldiers. Just stop fighting and the war will end of its own accord. You are not fighting for anything, anyway. What does it matter to you who owns Metz or Strassburg. You never saw those towns nor knew the people in them, so what do you care about them?
Page 115 - ... really matter two sticks to you how the war goes. "Your country needs you, your family needs you and you need your life for something better than being gassed, shot at, deafened by cannon shots and rendered unfit physically by the miserable life you must live here. The tales they tell you of the cruelties of German prison camps are fairy tales. Of course you may not like being a prisoner of war but anything is better than this infernal place with no hope of escape except by being wounded, after...
Page 124 - Colonel Tupes dashed with superb gallantry and admirable scorn of danger to the assault of a position continuously defended by the enemy, — taking it by storm under an exceptionally violent machine gun fire and very severe losses. They made numerous prisoners, captured cannon, machine guns, and important war material.
Page 174 - LAON-LA-FKRE— the forest of SAINT GOBAIN, principal center of resistance of the Hindenburg Line Was ours. November 5th the SERRE was at last crossed — the pursuit became active. Prout's Battalion distinguished itself at the SAL ST. PIERRE, where it captured a German battery. Patton's Battalion crossed, the first, the Hirson railroad atthe heights of AUBENTON, where the Germans tried to resist.
Page 173 - Both men fought bravely hand-to-hand encounters, one resorting to the use of a bolo knife after his rifle jammed and further fighting with bayonet and butt became impossible. There is evidence that at least one, and probably a second, German was severely cut. A third is known to have been shot. "Attention is drawn to the fact that the colored sentries were first attacked and continued fighting after receiving wounds, and despite the use of grenades by a superior force. They should be given credit...
Page 175 - Patton's Battalion crossed, the first, the Hirson railroad atthe heights of AUBENTON, where the Germans tried to resist. Duncan's Battalion took LOGNY, and carried away by their ardor, could not be stopped short of GUE d'HOSSUS, on November llth after the armistice.
Page 173 - Reports in hand show a notable instance of bravery and devotion shown by two soldiers of an American colored regiment operating in a French sector. Before daylight on May 15. Private Henry Johnson and Private Roberts while on sentry duty at some distance from one another, were attacked by a German raiding party, estimated at twenty men who advanced in two groups, attacking at once from flank and rear. "Both men fought bravely in...
Page 174 - Under command of Colonel Hayward, who, though Injured, insisted on leading his regiment in the battle, of Lieutenant Colonel Pickering, admirably cool and brave, of Major Cobb (killed), of Major Spencer (grievously wounded), of Major Little, a true leader of men, the...

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