The Foreign Policy of Canning, 1822-1827: England, the Neo-Holy Alliance and the New World

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G. Bell and sons, Limited, 1925 - 636 pages
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Page 124 - In the wars of the European powers, in matters relating to themselves, we have never taken any part, nor does it comport with our policy so to do.
Page 125 - This difference proceeds from that which exists in their respective governments. And to the defense of our own, which has been achieved by the loss of so much blood and treasure, and matured by the wisdom of their most enlightened citizens, and under which we have enjoyed unexampled felicity, this whole nation is devoted.
Page 124 - Our policy in regard to Europe, which was adopted at an early stage of the wars which have so long agitated that quarter of the globe, nevertheless remains the same, which is, not to interfere in the internal concerns of any of its powers...
Page 125 - It is impossible that the allied powers should extend their political system to any portion of either continent, without endangering our peace and happiness ; nor can any one believe that our southern brethren, if left to themselves, would adopt it of their own accord. It is equally impossible, therefore, that we should behold such interposition, in any form, with indifference.
Page 124 - ... is, not to interfere in the internal concerns of any of its powers ; to consider the government de facto as the legitimate government for us : to cultivate friendly relations with it, and to preserve those relations by a frank, firm, and manly policy; meeting, in all instances. the just claims of every power; submitting to injuries from none.
Page 119 - The resources created by peace are means of war. In cherishing those resources, we but accumulate those means. Our present repose is no more a proof of inability to act, than the state of inertness and inactivity in which...
Page 125 - In the discussions to which this interest has given rise, and in the arrangements by which they may terminate, the occasion has been judged proper for asserting as a principle in which the rights, and interests of the United States are involved, that the American continents, by the free and independent condition which they have assumed and maintain, are henceforth not to be considered as subjects for future colonization by any European powers.
Page 438 - I stood near him ; and his face, to use the expression of the Scripture of the first martyr, ' his face was as if it had been the face of an angel.
Page 16 - We shall be found in our place when actual danger menaces the system of Europe ; but this country cannot, and will not, act upon abstract and speculative principles of precaution.
Page 44 - To facilitate and to secure the execution of the present Treaty, and to consolidate the connections which at the present moment so closely unite the Four Sovereigns for the Happiness of the World, the High Contracting Parties have agreed to renew Their meetings at fixed periods, either under the immediate auspices of the Sovereigns Themselves, or by Their respective Ministers, for the purpose of consulting upon Their common interests, and for the consideration of the measures which at each of those...

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