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B. Herder, 1895 - 344 pages

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Page 212 - There has fallen a splendid tear From the passion-flower at the gate. She is coming, my dove, my dear; She is coming, my life, my fate; The red rose cries, 'She is near, she is near;' And the white rose weeps, 'She is late;' The larkspur listens, 'I hear, I hear;' And the lily whispers, 'I wait.
Page 67 - And she may still exist in undiminished vigour when some traveller from New Zealand shall, in the midst of a vast solitude, take his stand on a broken arch of London Bridge to sketch the ruins of St. Paul's.
Page 214 - And it came to pass at noon that Elijah mocked them, and said, Cry aloud : for he is a god ; either he is talking or he is pursuing, or he is in a journey, or peradventure he sleepeth, and must be awaked.
Page 167 - Some books are to be tasted, others to be swallowed, and some few to be chewed and digested; that is, some books are to be read only in parts; others to be read, but not curiously; and some few to be read wholly, and with diligence and attention.
Page 58 - The stars shall fade away, the sun himself Grow dim with age, and Nature sink in years, But thou shalt flourish in immortal youth, Unhurt amidst the war of elements, The wreck of matter, and the crush of worlds.
Page 193 - Quarry the granite rock with razors, or moor the vessel with a thread of silk ; then may you hope with such keen and delicate instruments as human knowledge and human reason to contend against those giants, the passion and the pride of man.
Page 152 - Monosyllables, and words accented on the last syllable, ending with a single consonant preceded by a single vowel, double that consonant, when they take another syllable beginning with a vowel : as, wit, witty ; thin, thinnish ; to abet, an abettor ; to begin, a beginner.
Page 253 - O hours of indolence and discontent, Not now to be redeemed ! ye sting not less Because I know this span of life was lent For lofty duties, not for selfishness. Not to be wiled away in aimless dreams, But to improve ourselves, and serve mankind, Life, and its choicest faculties were given.
Page 191 - Farewell) a long farewell, to all my greatness ! This is the state of man : to-day he puts forth The tender leaves of hope ; to-morrow blossoms, And bears his blushing honors thick upon him : The third day, comes a frost, a killing frost ; And when he thinks, good easy man, full surely His greatness is a ripening, — nips his root, And then he falls, as I do.
Page 171 - ... to give an early preference to honour above gain, when they stand in competition ; to despise every advantage which cannot be attained without dishonest arts ; to brook no meanness, and to stoop to no dissimulation, are the indications of a great mind, the presages of future eminence and distinction in life.

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