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× Man - insignif. of in compar, with t. whole Univase to 565

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494

505

510

519

588

624

624

467

203

425

593

466

139

Marriage: those marriages the most happy that
are preceded by a long courtship
261
Unhappy marriages, from whence proceeding 268
Marriage life, always a vexatious or happy con-

149

dition
Married condition rarely unhappy but from
want of judgment or temper in the husband 479
Advantages of it preferable to a single state 479,500
Termed purgatory by Tom Dapperwit
The excellence of its institution
The pleasure and uneasiness of married per-
sons, to what imputed

196

264
264

408

441

441

482
490

506

522

522

525
425

446

8

8

107

137

account

·

Dangerous to the ladies
Described

420

519

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racter

428

Merchants of great benefit to the public 69, 174
Mercy, whoever wants it has no taste of enjoy.

456

ment

Merit, no judgment to be formed of it from suc-

cess

Valuable according to the application of it
Merry part of the world amiable
'Messiah,' a sacred eclogue

The Jews' mistaken notion of the Messiah's
worldly grandeur

610

Metamorphoses, (Ovid's) like enchanted ground 417
Metaphor, when noble, casts a glory round it
Metaphors, when vicious

421

595

595

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An instance of it

Method, the want of it, in whom only support.
able

The use and necessity of it in writings
Seldom found in coffee-house debates

Military education, a letter about it
Mill to make verses

220


Miller, (James) his challenge to Timothy Buck 436
Milton's Paradise Lost:' the Spectator's criti-
cisms and observations on that poem, 267,
273, 279, 285, 291, 297, 303, 309, 315, 321
His subject conformable to the talents of
which he was master

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His fable a master-piece

A continuation of the Spectator's criticism on
'Paradise Lost' 327, 333, 339, 345, 351,
357, 363, 369
The moral of that poem, and length of time
contained in the action

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No.

365

365

395

425

23

430

622

417

522

144

The vast genius of Milton
His poem of Il Penseroso'

His description of the archangel and the evil
spirits addressing themselves for the combat 463
Mimickry, (art of) why we delight in it
Mind, (human) the wonderful nature of it
Minister, a watchful one described
Minutius, his character

416
554

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293

340

598

378

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Mirth in a man ought always to be accidental
The awkward pretenders to it
Distinguished from cheerfulness

Mirza, the vision of

Mischief rather to be suffered than an inconve-
nience

564

Misfortunes, our judgments upon them reproved 483
Mixt wit described

62

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476

476

476

566

315
315

369
417

425

439

422

196

358

381

159

12
6
129
312
6
154

206
206

231
231

Vicious modesty, what
The misfortunes to which the modest and

Rules recommended to the modest man by
the Spectator

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innocent are often exposed
Distinguished from sheepishness
The definition of modesty
Wherein it consists

Modest assurance, what
The danger of false modesty
Distinguished from the true
An unnecessary virtue in professors of the law 484
The sentiments entertained of it by the an-
cients

458

484

Mohock, the meaning of that name

484
324

347

Several conjectures concerning the Mohocks
Moliere made an old woman a judge of his plays
Money: the Spectator proposes it as a thesis 442
The power of it

70

450

The love of it very commendable

Monsters, novelty bestows charms on them
Incapable of propagation

What gives satisfaction in the sight of them
Montague, fond of speaking of himself
Scaliger's saying of him

Monuments in Westminster Abbey examined
by the Spectator

Those raised by envy the most glorious
Moorfields, by whom resorted to
Morality, the benefit of it

Strengthens faith

More, (Sir Thomas) his gayety at his death, to
what owing

Mortality, the lover's bill of

Mothers justly reproved for not nursing their
own children

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misunderstood

The method of mourning considered

Who the greatest mourners

Mouse Alley Doctor

Much cry but little wool, to whom applied
Muly Moluch, Emperor of Morocco, his great
intrepidity in his dying moments

Music, banished by Plato out of his common-
wealth

Of a relative nature

Music, (Church) of the improvement of it
It may raise confused notions of things in the
fancy
Recommended

Musician, (burlesque) an account of one

No.

231

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Improves what is great and beautiful

242

Why a secret pleasure annexed to its idea
Every thing so that pleases in architecture
Newberry, (Mr.) his rebus

373

373 New river, a project for bringing it into the
390 play house

373 News, how the English thirst after it

458

Project for a supply of it

450

412

413

418

562

562

349

377

246

Motion of the gods, wherein it differs from that
of mortals according to Heliodorus

369

Motteux, (Peter) dedicates his poem on tea to
the Spectator

·

552
221

Motto, the effects of a handsome one

Mourning: the signs of true mourning generally

444

251

349

18

29

405

26

355

505

Novels, great inflamers to women's blood
459 Novelty, the force of it

465

November, (month of) described

Nurses: the frequent inconveniences of hired

ones

Nutmeg of delight, one of the Persian Empe-
ror's titles

416

630

..570

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Why thought to be a sham one

An excellent actor

A letter from Cleora against it
Neighbourhoods, of whom consisting
Nemesis, an old maid, a discoverer of judgments
New or uncommon, why every thing that is so
raises a pleasure in the imagination
What understood by the term with respect to
objects

411

Of whispers

The pleasure of news

Newton, (Sir Isaac) his noble way of consider-
ing infinite space

Nicholas Heart, the annual sleeper
Nicodemuncio's letter to Olivia
Nicolini, his perfection in music

Nicolini, (signior,) his voyage on pasteboard
His combat with a lion

95

·

64 Economy, wherein compared to good breeding 114
Ogler: the complete ogler

64

Old maids generally superstitious

Old Testament in a periwig
Omniamante, her character

Night, a clear one described

Whimsically described by William Ramsay 5
Night walk in the country

Nightingale, its music highly delightful to a man

love

Nigranilla, a party lady, forced to patch on the
wrong side

No, a word of great use to women in love mat-

ters

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Opera, as it is the present entertainment of the
English stage, considered

The progress it has made in our theatre
Some account of the French opera •

OATES, (Dr.) a favourite with some party ladies 57
Obedience of children to their parents, the basis
of all government .

Obscurity, the only defence against reproach
Often more illustrious than grandeur

Obsequiousness in behaviour considered
Ode (Laplander's) to his mistress

Opinion (popular) described

Opportunities to be carefully avoided by the fair

sex

PAINTER and tailor often contribute more than
the poet to the success of tragedy
Pamphilio, a good master
412| Pamphlets, defamatory, detestable

Orator, what requisite to form one

Orbicilla, her character

219

Order, necessary to be kept up in the world
Ostentation, an inhabitant of the paradise of fools 460
Otway commended and censured

456

His description of the miseries of law suits
Overdo, a justice at Epping, offended at the
company of strollers for playing the part of
Clodpate, and making a mockery of one of
the quorum

Ovid, in what he excels

His description of the palace of Fame
His verse on making love at the theatre.
translated by Mr. Dryden

How to succeed in his manner

618

Outrageously virtuous, what women so called 26
Oxford scholar, his great discovery in a coffee-
house

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Pedants, who so to be reputed

The book-pedant the most supportable
Pedants in breeding as well as learning
Peepers described

Peevish fellow described

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The use of the passions

The passions treated of

What moves them in descriptions most pleas-

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ing

In all men, but appear not in all
Of hope and fear

The work of a philosopher to subdue the pas
sions

Instances of their power

Passions of the fan, a treatise for the use of the

author's scholars

Patience, an allegorical discourse upon it

Her power

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Penelope's web, the story of it

Penkethman, the comedian, his many qualifica-

tions

Person, the word defined by Mr. Locke
Persons, imaginary, not proper for an heroic

No.

415
460
417

21

192

304

313

426

514

18

57

125

125

125

126

57

81

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125

399

432

520

438

438

71

215

215

224
255

408

418

418

471

564

564

•Penseroso,' (poem of) by Milton

People. the only riches of a country
Pericles, ais advice to the women
Persecution in religious matters immoral
Persian children, what learnt by them in their

schools
337
Persian soldier reproved for railing against an
enemy

427

99

Persians, their instruction of their youth
Their notions of parricide

189

578

102

501 Pin-money condemned

559
214

clients, a discourse on them
Worthy patrons compared to guardian angels 214
Paul Lorrain, a design of his
Peace, some ill consequences of it
Pedantic humour

338

370

425

200

81

459

357

577

Petition of John-a-Nokes and John-a-Stiles
Petition from a cavalier for a place, with his
pretensions to it
Petronius and Socrates, their cheerful behaviour

629

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Pisistratus, the Athenian tyrant, his generous
behaviour on a particular occasion
45 Pitch-pipe, the invention and use of it
617 Pittacus, a wise saying of his about riches.
105 Pity, is love softened by sorrow

105
286

That and Terror leading passions in poetry
The reasonableness of pity

438

53 Place and precedency more contested among
women of an inferior rank than ladies of
quality

606

Places of trust, who most fit for them

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Pinkethman to personate King Porus on an

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places

Planets, to survey them fills us with astonish-

ment

305

76

76

tions

Wherein to be condemned

The precedency settled among them
Playhouse, how improved in storms

16

21

21

119
469

Why courted by men of generous principles 469
The unreasonableness of party-pretences to

629

25

86

41

41

420

Planting recommended to country gentlemen 583,589
Plato, his notion of the soul

90

416

418

244

201

467

295

31

527

228

574

397

418

588

Wherein, according to him and his followers,
the punishment of a voluptuous man consists 90
His account of Socrates's behaviour the morn.
ing he was to die

His description of the Supreme Being
His saying of labour

Players in Drury Lane, their intended regula-

183
507

624

36
502

529
592

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Popular applause, the vanity of it
Posterity, its privilege

Poverty, the inconveniences and mortifications
usually attending it

The loss of merit

Powell, (senior) to act Alexander the Great on
a dromedary

His artifice to raise a clap

Powell, (junior) his great skill in motions

His performance referred to the opera of Ri-
naldo and Armida

No.

197

462

462

nour

Pride, a great enemy to a fine face

A man crazed with it, a mortifying sight

151
151

183

Power, despotic, an unanswerable argument
against it

411

556

568

90

430

523

188

101

150

464

14

·

287

38, 467

Practice and example, their prevalency on youth 337
Praise, the love of it implanted in us
A generous mind the most sensible of it 238
Why not freely conferred on men till dead
When changed into fame.
Prayers, Phoenix's allegorical description of them
to Achilles in Homer

349
551

391

The folly and extravagance of our prayers in
general, make set forms necessary
Precipice, distant, why its prospect pleases
Prediction, the many arts of it in use among the
vulgar
Prejudice, the prevalency of it

·

A letter about it, as it respects parties in Eng-
land

Prerogative, when and how asserted with ho-

Psalm 114th translated
Psalmist against hypocrisy
Of Providence

Punch, out in the moral part

Punchinello frequented more than the church
403 Punishments in schools disapproved

403

403 Punning recommended by the practice of all
403

403

403

403

403

239

280

31

40

14

391

418

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505

101

432

480

33

201

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Whose privilege

A pun of thought

By whom punning is affected
Punsters, their talents

ages

In what age the pun chiefly flourished

A famous university much infested with it
Why banished at present out of the learned
world .

The definition of a pun

Puss, speculations on an old and a young one
Puzzle, (Tom) an eminent immethodical dispu-

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about news

Quir, (Peter de) his letter to the Spectator about
puns

Quixotte, (Don) patron of the Sighers Club

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Wide ones pleasing to the fancy
Enlivened by rivers and falls of water
That of hills and valleys soon tires .

Prospect of peace, a poem on that subject com-
mended by the Spectator

Prosperity, to what compared by Seneca

Proverbs (the 7th chapter of) turned into verse 410
Providence demonstrative arguments for it
Not to be fathomed by reason

120

Prudence, the influence it has on our good cor
ill-fortune in the world

· 412

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Rich: to be rich, the way to please
The advantages of riches

The art of growing rich
The proper use of riches

The defects of rich men overlooked

Revenge of a Spanish lady on a man who boasted
of her favours

Rhubarb, (John, Esq.) his memorial from the
country infirmary

Rich, (Mr.) would not suffer the opera of Whit-
tington's cat to be performed in his house,
and the reason for it

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No.

510

454

582

Richlieu, (Cardinal) his politics made France
the terror of Europe

Riches corrupt men's morals

6

120

408

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408
59

59

59

29

29
258

Reputation a species of fame

The stability of it, if well founded
Retirement, the pleasure of it where truly en-
joyed
A dream of it
Revelation, what light it gives to the joys of
heaven

4
425

600

316

459

494

494

426

431

487
487

382
218

218

611

429

Roman and Sabine ladies, their example recom-
mended to the British

294

464

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The match maker

Seneca, his saying of drunkenness

Sense: some men of, more despicable than beg-
gars

305
464
245

The different degrees of sense in the several
different species of animals

·

Ridicule, the talent of ungenerous tempers
Ridicule, the two great branches of, in writing 249 Sentry, (Captain) a member of the Spectator's
Put to a good use
club, his character

445

Riding, a healthy exercise

115
435

Riding-dress of ladies, the extravagance of it
Rival mother, the first part of her history
Robin, the porter at Will's coffee-house, his

91

qualification

398

The most offensive

Seasons, a dream of them

Self conceit, an inhabitant of the paradise of
fools

Self denial, the great foundation of civil virtue
Self love transplanted, what

The narrowness and danger of self love
5 Semanthe, her character
280 Semiramis, her prodigious works and powers
283 Sempronia, a professed admirer of the French

233

nation

No

81

502

Schoolmasters, the ignorance and want of dis-
cernment in the generality of them 157, 168, 313
Schoolmen their ass case
191
How applied
191

552

69
620

400

449

491

633

198

Scipio, his judgment of Marius when a boy 157
Scornful lady,' Spectator's observations at that
play

Scot, (Dr.) his christian life, its merits
Scotch, a saying of theirs
Scribblers against Spectator, why neglected by
him

409

28

259

460

25

344
223

223

229

568

451

473

209

426

451

460

223

609
58

270

447
463

445
582

425

460

248

129

588

404

415

45
437
569

6

519

2

152

His account of a soldier's life

His discourse with a young wrangler in the
law

197

He receives a letter from Ipswich, giving an
account of an engagement between a

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