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Sight, the most perfect sense

Pleasures of imagination arise originally
from it

Furnishes it with ideas
Sight, second, in Scotland

Sign posts, the absurdity of many of them
Silk-worm, a character of one
Similitudes, eminent writers faulty in them
The preservation of several poems
An ill one in a pulpit

Simonides, his satire on women
Sincerity, the great want of it in conversation
The advantage of it over dissimulation and de-

ceit

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584

Sherlock, (Dr.) the reason his discourse of death
hath been so much perused

289

447

536

Improved the notion of heaven and hell
Shoeing horns, who, and by whom employed
Shovel, (Sir Cloudesley) the ill contrivance of
his monument in Westminster Abbey
Shows and diversions lie properly within the
province of the Spectator

26

235

·

513

Sickness, a thought on it
Sidney, (Sir Philip) his opinion of the song of
Chevy Chase'

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No.

350
350

517

425

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88

96

400
433

23

141

419

562

70

400

30

30

41

352

352

The most compendious wisdom
Singularity, when a virtue -

576

An instance of it in a north country gentleman 576
Sippit, (Jack) his character
448
Slavery, what kind of government the most re-
moved from it

287

Sloven, a character affected by some, and for
what reason

The folly and antiquity of it

Sly, the haberdasher, advertisement to young
gentlemen in the last year of their appren-
ticeship
Sly, (John) the tobacconist, his representation
to the Spectator
His minute
Smithfield, bargain in marriage, the inhumanity

of it

411

411

604

28

454

421

421

455

209

103

304
Snape, (Dr.) a quotation from his charity sermon 294
Snarlers

438
138

28

133

146

183

150

150

187

532

534

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His project for forming a new club
Visits Mr. Motteux's warehouses

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A sort of news letter

His account of a coffee-house debate, relating

481

to the difference between Count Rechteran
and Monsieur Mesnager
The different sense of his readers upon the
rise of his paper, and the Spectator's propo-
sal upon it

The different judgments of his readers con-
cerning his speculations

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His reasons for often casting his thoughts into
a letter

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The great concern the city is in upon his de-

sign of laying down his paper

He takes leave of the town

Breaks a fifty years' silence
How he recovered his speech
Ilis politics
Loquacity
Of no party
A calamity of his
Critics upon him

He sleeps as well as wakes for the public
His dream of Trophonius' cave-
Why the eighth volume published
Speech, the several organs of it

.

Spenser, his advice to young ladies under the
distress of defamation

His whole creation of shadowy persons

Spies, not to be trusted,

Despised by great men

Spirit, a high one, a great enemy to candour
Spirits, the appearance of them not fabulous
Several species in the world besides ourselves
Spleen, a common excuse for dulness

Its effects
VOL. II.

58

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No.

133

179

355
356

442

445

463

468

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599
632

231

110

419

53
558

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Squires, (rural) their want of learning
Stamps, how fatal to weekly historians
Starch, political, its use
Starers reproved

Stars, (fixed) how their immensity and magnifi-
cence confound us

449

Sun, the first eye of consequence

461 Sun-rising and setting most glorious show in na-
461

A contemplation of the stars

State, (future) the refreshments a virtuous per-
son enjoys in prospect and contemplation
of it

186

Statira, in what proposed as a pattern to the fair

sex

41

416

448

Statuary the most natural representation
Stint (Jack) and will Trap, their adventure
Stoics discarded all passions
Stores of Providence, what

397

248
138

Story tellers, their ridiculous punctuality
Strife, the spirit of it

· 197

479

Stripes, the use of them on perverse wives
Stroke, to strike a bold one, what meant by it 319
Sublime in writing what it is

592

Sudden, (Thomas esq.) his memorial from the
country infirmary

429

410

250

·

Sukey's adventure with Will Honeycomb and
Sir Roger de Coverley

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ture

Superiority reduced to the notion of quality
To be founded only on merit and virtue
Superstition, the folly of it described .

An error arising from a mistaken devotion
Has something in it destructive of religion
Surprise, the life of stories
'Susanna, or Innocence Betrayed,' to be ex-
hibited by Powell, with a new pair of El-
ders

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488
523

14
332

523

Sweaters, a species of the Mohock club

523 Swingers, a set of familiar romps at Tunbridge 492
Symmetry of objects, how it strikes
526 Syncopists,modern ones

411
567

438

Syncropius, the passionate, his character
542Syracusan prince, jealous of his wife, how he
served her

579

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542

550 TALE-BEARERS censured

439

·

553

552 Talents to be valued according as they are ap.
plied
172
Taste (corrupt) of the age to what attribut-
ed
140, 208
556 Taste of writing, what it is, and how acquired 409
The perfection of a man's taste as a sense
Defined

555

409

556
556
556

409

That of the English

409

556 Tears not always the sign of true sorrow

95

558 Temper, serious, the advantage of it

568 Temperance, the best preservative of health
What kind of temperance the best .

599

Templar, one of the Spectator's club, his cha-

racter ·

Temple, (Sir William) his rule for drinking
Ten, called by Platonic writers the complete
number

209

529

445

305

20

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420

565

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412

219

202
7
201
213
538

221

390
419

Tender hearts, an entertainment for them. 627
439 Tenure, the most slippery in England
623
489 Terence, Spectator's observations on one of his
plays

382

398

195
195

2
195

502

418
594

Terror and pity, why those passions please
Thales, his saying of truth and falsehood
Thames, its banks, and the boats on it described 454
That, his remonstrance

80

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No.

Theatre, (English) the practice of it in several
instances censured

42, 44, 51
602

Of making love in a Theatre
Themistocles, his answer to a question relating
to the marrying his daughter
Theodosius and Constantia, their adventures
Theognis, a beautiful saying of his
Thimbleton, (Ralph) his letter to the Spectator 432
Thinking aloud, what

464

211

399

Thoughts of the highest importance to sift them
Thrash (Will) and his wife, an insipid couple 522
Thunder, of great use on the stage -
Thunderer to the playhouse, the hardships put
upon him, and his desire to be made a

44

cannon

Tickell, (Mr.) his verses to the Spectator
Tillotson, (Archbishop) improved the notion of
heaven and hell

Time, our ill use of it

The Spectator's direction how to spend it
How the time we live ought to be computed
Title-page, (Anthony) his petition to the Specta

tor

Tom Tulip, challenged by Dick Crastin

Flies into the country

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Titles, the significancy and abuse of them
Tom Tit, to personate singing birds in the Opera
Tom Touchy, a quarrelsome fellow
Tom Trusty, a tender husband and careful fa-
ther

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3

164

Tom the tyrant, first minister at the coffee-house
between the hours of eleven and twelve at
night.
Tombs in Westminster Abbey visited by Spec-

49

tator

26

His reflections upon them

26

Toper, (Jack) his recommendatory letter in be-
half of a servant

493

Torre, in Devonshire, how unchaste widows
are punished there.

614

Torture, why the description of it pleases, and
not the prospect

418
560

69

174

36
532

Truepenny, (Jack) strangely good-natured
Trunk-maker, a great man in the upper gallery
in the playhouse
Truth, an enemy to false wit

447

93

93
316

304
480

283

237

39

Wherein the modern tragedy exceeds that of
Greece and Rome

39

5

122

479
91

91

39
39

40

211

343

408

449

45

45

364

474

Travellers, the generality of them exploded
Trees, more beautiful in all their luxuriancy
than when cut and trimmed
414
Trimming, the Spectator unjustly accused of it 445
Trueby, (Widow) her water recommended by
Sir Roger, as good against the stone and
gravel

329
82

235
63

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No.1

Understanding, the abuse of it is a great evil
Wherein more perfect than the imagination 420
Reasons for it

420

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438

Should master the passions
Universe, how pleasing the contemplation of it 420
Uranius, his great composure of soul
Vulcan's dogs, the fable of them

143
· 579

WAGERING disputants exposed
Wall, the prodigious one of China
Wars, the late, made us so greedy of news
Wasps and doves in public, who
Wealth, the father of love

Wealthy men fix the character of persons to
their circumstances

469

525

Wedlock, state of, ridiculed by town witlings
Weed, (Ephraim) his letter to the Spectator
about his marriage and estates
West Enborne, in Berkshire, a custom there for
widows

450

614

623

607
457
439
117

Who and Which, their petition to the Spectator 78
Whole Duty of Man,' that excellent book
turned into a satire


568

113

113

113

What Lord Coke said of the widow's tenure
there

Whichenovre bacon flitch, in Staffordshire, who
entitled to it

Whisperers, political

Whispering place, Dionysius the tyrant's
White, (Moll) a notorious witch

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Widow, (the) her manner of captivating Sir
Roger de Coverley

Her behaviour at the trial of her cause
Her artifices and beauty
Too desperate a scholar for a country gentle-

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Very pernicious when not tempered with vir-
tue and humanity

Turned into deformity by affectation

Only to be valued as it is applied

The history of false wit

Nothing so much admired and so little under-
stood

113
113

113

115

118
311

561

573
606

614
523
407

118

516

108
108

108

119

126

131

140

477

225

477

522

416

419

504

509

342

390

A definition of woman by one of the fathers 265
The general depravity of the inferior part of
the sex

No.

59

62

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62

63

220

YARICO, the story of her adventure
Yawning, a Christmas gambol

Youth, instructions to them to avoid harlots

Woman's man described

4

His necessary qualifications
Women, the more powerful part of our people
Their ordinary employments
Smitten with superficials

10

15

15

Women: their usual conversation
Their strongest passion

33

33

Not to be considered merely as objects of
sight
Women, (the English) excel other nations in
beauty

81

92

Signs of their improvement under Spectator's
hand
The real commendation of a woman, what 95, 104
Their pains in all ages to adorn the outside
of their heads

More gay in their nature than men
Not pleased with modesty in men
Their ambition

98

128

154

156

182

Deluding women, their practises exposed
Women great orators -

· 247

Have always designs upon men

433

Greater tyrants to their lovers than husbands 486
Reproved for their neglect of dress after they
are married.

506

Their wonderful influence upon the other sex 510
Words, the abuse of them demonstrated in seve-
ral instances

373

274

320

The pleasures proceeding to the imagination
from the ideas raised by them
Work necessary for women
World, (the) considered useful and entertaining 387
The present world a nursery for the next
World of matter, and life, considered by Spec-

111

tator

69
156

156

23

23

38 ZEAL, intemperate, criminal

6 Zemrode, (Queen) her story from the Persian

6

58

616
• 606

Writer, how to perfect his imagination
Who among the ancient poets had this fa-
culty

417

568

Writing, the difficulty of it to avoid censure
Writing unintelligibly, the art of it much im-
proved

379

XENOPHON, his school of equity

337

His account of Cyrus's trying the virtue of a
young lord

564

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519

417

11
179

410

390

Tales

578

Zoilus, the pretended critic, had a very long
beard

331

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