The English Review, Or, An Abstract of English and Foreign Literature, Volume 7

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J. Murray, 1786

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Page 233 - He is a path, if any be misled ; He is a robe, if any naked be ; If any chance to hunger, he is bread ; If any be a bondman, he is free ; If any be but weak, how strong is he ! To dead men life he is, to sick men health, To blind men sight, and to the needy wealth ; A pleasure without loss, a treasure without stealth.
Page 292 - Some glossy-leaved, and shining in the sun, The maple, and the beech of oily nuts Prolific, and the lime at dewy eve Diffusing odours ; nor unnoted pass The sycamore, capricious in attire, Now green, now tawny, and ere autumn yet Have changed the woods, in scarlet honours bright.
Page 295 - Or, will he seek to dazzle me with tropes, As with the diamond on his lily hand, And play his brilliant parts before my eyes, When I am hungry for the bread of life ? He mocks his Maker, prostitutes and shames His noble office, and, instead of truth, Displaying his own beauty, starves his flock ! Therefore, avaunt all attitude, and stare, And start theatric, practised at the glass ! I seek divine simplicity in him Who handles things divine...
Page 406 - And they brought up an evil report of the land which they had searched unto the children of Israel, saying, The land, through which we have gone to search it, is a land that eateth up the inhabitants thereof ; and all the people that we saw in it are men of a great stature. And there we saw the giants, the sons of Anak, which come of the giants ; and we were in our own sight as grasshoppers, and so we were in their sight.
Page 406 - There were giants in the earth in those days ; and also after that, when the sons of God came in unto the daughters of men, and they bare children to them, the same became mighty men which were of old, men of renown.
Page 268 - America, by beginning to allay ferments and soften animosities there ; and, above all, for preventing, in the mean time, any sudden and fatal catastrophe at Boston, now suffering under the daily irritation of an army before their eyes...
Page 292 - Whom call we gay? That honour has been long The boast of mere pretenders to the name. The innocent are gay. — the lark is gay, That dries his feathers, saturate with dew, Beneath the rosy cloud, while yet the beams Of dayspring overshoot his humble nest. The peasant too, a witness of his song, Himself a songster, is as gay as he.
Page 454 - He was beloved by his people, who looked up to him as to a father, and obeyed his commands with alacrity. The confidence we placed in him was unremitting; our admiration of his great talents unbounded; our esteem for his good qualities affectionate and sincere.
Page 95 - During several of the summer months of the year 1783, when the effects of the sun's rays to heat the earth in these northern regions should have been the greatest, there existed a constant fog over all Europe and great part of North America. This fog was of a permanent nature ; it was dry, and the rays of the sun seemed to have little effect towards dissipating it, as they easily do a moist fog arising from water.
Page 406 - And it came to pass, when men began to multiply upon the face of the earth, and daughters were born unto them, that the sons of God saw the daughters of men, that they were fair ; and they took them wives of all which they chose.

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