The Historical Relations of Medicine and Surgery to the End of the Sixteenth Century: An Address Delivered at the St. Louis Congress in 1904

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Macmillan and Company, limited, 1905 - 125 pages
 

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Page 46 - and not without prejudice ; yet I cannot wonder that Fallopius compared the author to Hippocrates, or that John Freind calls him the Prince of Surgeons. It is rich, aphoristic, orderly and precise. As a clerk, he wrote in latin, in the awkward hybrid tongue that medical latin then was, containing many Arabian, Provençal and French words, but very little greek
Page 34 - and used styptics (rabbit's fur, aloes, and white of egg was a popular styptic in elder surgery), digital compression for an hour, or in severe cases ligature. His chapter on injuries of the head is one of the classics of medieval surgery. Clerk as he was, Lanfranc nevertheless saw but the more clearly the danger of
Page 33 - abuse of the cautery ; he investigated the causes of the failure of healing by first intention ; he described the danger of wounds of the neck; he sutured divided nerves ; he forwarded the diagnosis of suppurative disease of the hip ; and he referred chancre and
Page 30 - for it is not necessary, as Roger and Roland have written, as many of their disciples teach, and as all modern surgeons profess, that pus should be generated in wounds. No error can be greater than this. Such a practice is indeed to hinder nature, to prolong the disease, and to prevent the conglutination and consolidation of the wound." (Book II. c. 27.) In principle what more did
Page 33 - one of the protestants of the period against the division of surgery from inner medicine ; a division which he regarded as a separation of Medicine from intimate touch with nature. Like Lanfranc and the other great surgeons of the Italian tradition, and unlike Franco and Paré, he had the advantage of the liberal university education of Italy ; but, like Paré and
Page 33 - discovered that dropsy may be due to a " durities renum " ; he substituted the knife for the arabist abuse of the cautery ; he investigated the causes of the failure of healing by first intention ; he described the danger of wounds of the neck; he sutured divided nerves ; he forwarded the diagnosis of suppurative disease of the hip ; and he referred chancre and
Page 68 - the end of the fifteenth century and the beginning of the sixteenth, there were,
Page 11 - The chief lesson of the Hippocratic period for us is that, in practice as in honour, medicine and surgery were then one. The Greek physician had no more scruple in using his hands in the service of his brains than had Pheidias or Archimedes ; and it was by this co-operation that in the fifth century an advance was achieved which in our eyes is
Page 130 - v LANE MEDICAL LIBRARY STANFORD UNIVERSITY This book should be returned on or
Page 39 - if you have operated conscientiously on the rich for a proper fee, and on the poor for charity, you need not play the monk, nor make pilgrimages for your soul.

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