The English Church from the Accession of Charles I. to the Death of Anne (1625-1714) by the Rev. William Holden Hutton...

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Macmillan and Company, limited, 1903 - 368 pages
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Page 81 - God, promise, vow and protest to maintain and defend, as far as lawfully I may, with my Life, Power and Estate the true Reformed Protestant Religion, expressed in the Doctrine of the Church of England, against all Popery and Popish Innovations within this Realm, contrary to the same Doctrine...
Page 140 - ... but that Cromwell would never consent to it ; it may be, out of too much contempt of his enemies. In a word, as he had all the wickednesses against which damnation is denounced, and for which hell-fire is prepared, so he had some virtues which have caused the memory of some men in all ages to be celebrated ; and he will be looked upon by posterity as a brave bad man.
Page 118 - II. That we shall in like manner, without respect of persons, endeavour the extirpation of popery, prelacy (that is, Church government by archbishops, bishops, their chancellors and commissaries, deans, deans and chapters, archdeacons, and all other ecclesiastical officers depending on that hierarchy...
Page 67 - Whosoever shall bring in innovation of religion, or by favour or countenance seek to extend or introduce Popery or Arminianism, or other opinion disagreeing from the true and orthodox Church, shall be reputed a capital enemy to this Kingdom and Commonwealth.
Page 344 - Sat pining all his life there, did scarce trust His own hands with the dust, Yet would not place one piece above, but lives In fear of thieves.
Page 73 - And all these things I do plainly and sincerely acknowledge and swear, according to these express words by me spoken, and according to the plain and common sense and understanding of the same words, without any equivocation or mental evasion or secret reservation whatsoever: And I do make this recognition and acknowledgment heartily, willingly, and truly, upon the true faith of a Christian, So help me God.
Page 167 - ... a liberty to tender consciences, and that no man shall be disquieted or called in question for differences of opinion in matter of religion which do not disturb the peace of the kingdom...
Page 327 - Faith is not built on disquisitions vain ; The things we must believe are few and plain : But since men will believe more than they need. And every man will make himself a creed, In doubtful questions 'tis the safest way *ss To learn what unsuspected...
Page 313 - Those dainties are not for a spiritual maw. Observe your distance, and be sure to stand Hard by the cistern with your cap in hand : There for diversion you may pick your teeth, Till...
Page 274 - Temporal and spiritual government, are but two words brought into the world, to make men see double, and mistake their lawful sovereign.

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