Assist Me to Proclaim: The Life and Hymns of Charles Wesley

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Wm. B. Eerdmans Publishing, 2007 - 356 pages
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Charles Wesley (1707-1788) was the cofounder of Methodism and the author of more than 9,000 hymns and sacred poems, including such favorites as -Hark! the Herald Angels Sing, - -O for a Thousand Tongues to Sing, - and -Christ the Lord Is Risen Today.- John Tyson here traces the remarkable life of this influential man from cradle to grave, using rare -- including previously unpublished -- hymns, letters, and journal materials.

As the younger brother of John Wesley, Charles was a vital partner in the Methodist revival. While often standing in the shadow of his more famous brother, Charles Wesley was arguably the founder of the Oxford Holy Club, and he actually experienced evangelical conversion three days prior to John. In Assist Me to Proclaim Tyson explores, among other things, behind-the-scenes questions about the brothers' sometimes-stormy relationship.

Notwithstanding all his accomplishments as an evangelist and itinerant preacher, Charles is chiefly remembered for his startling facility at writing hymns that show God at work in almost every instance of life. His remarkable legacy endures around the world, as hundreds of Charles Wesley hymns are still sung in churches everywhere today.

Assist Me to Proclaim draws a picture of a man whose fidelity to both the Church of England and the original vision of Methodism energized his remarkable abilities as a revivalist and hymn writer. Readers also get a glimpse into Wesley's heart and mind through the window of his hymn texts. This is a biography that any student of church history or hymnody will welcome.

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Avis d'utilisateur  - Edward Shirley - Christianbook.com

Great book on Charles Wesley. The author brought more insight and information into John Wesley's brother. I find it hard to locate good resources on Charles Wesley. This is indeed a valuable resource. Consulter l'avis complet

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Avis d'utilisateur  - DrSmeeton - LibraryThing

By his earlier publications, John R. Tyson established himself as an authority on the Wesley brothers and early Methodism. Although the book lacks footnotes, Tyson has done his homework and the ... Consulter l'avis complet

Pages sélectionnées

Table des matières

Beginnings
1
An American Adventure
19
Pentecost Becomes Personal
40
Into the Streets and Highways
59
He Offers Christ to All
72
The Snare of Stillness
83
The Poison of Calvin
99
A Man Made for Friendship
117
Father of a Family
199
The Old Ship
215
Perfection
230
Poet Laureate
252
To the Brink of Separation
272
The London Years
288
Ordination Is Separation
306
Last Battles
323

The Lions Den
135
My Dearest Sally
153
A Partnership Strained
171
Reforming the Preachers
186
A Note on the Sources
340
Index
348
Droits d'auteur

Expressions et termes fréquents

Fréquemment cités

Page 46 - For whether is easier to say, Thy sins be forgiven thee ; or to say, Arise, and walk ? But that ye may know that the Son of man hath power on earth to forgive sins, (then saith he to the sick of the palsy,) Arise, take up thy bed, and go unto thine house.
Page 146 - ... as unknown, and yet well known; as dying, and, behold, we live; as chastened, and not killed; as sorrowful, yet alway rejoicing; as poor, yet making many rich; as having nothing, and yet possessing all things.
Page 141 - What shall we then say to these things ? If God be for us, who can be against us ? He that spared not his own Son, but delivered him up for us all, how shall he not with him also freely give us all things?
Page 29 - The light of the body is the eye. If therefore thine eye be single, thy whole body shall be full of light. But if thine eye be evil, thy whole body shall be full of darkness.
Page 45 - For he will finish the work, and cut it short in righteousness : because a short work will the Lord make upon the earth.
Page 145 - Fear not; for thou shalt not be ashamed : neither be thou confounded ; for thou shalt not be put to shame : for thou shalt forget the shame of thy youth, and shalt not remember the reproach of thy widowhood any more.
Page 64 - I tell you, keep away from these men and let them alone; for if this plan or this undertaking is of men, it will fail; 39 but if it is of God, you will not be able to overthrow them. You might even be found opposing God!
Page 34 - Before me place, in dread array, The pomp of that tremendous day, When Thou with clouds shalt come To judge the nations at Thy bar ; And tell me, Lord, shall I be there, To meet a joyful doom ? 4 Be this my one great business here, With serious industry and fear, Eternal bliss to insure ; Thine utmost counsel to fulfil, And suffer all Thy righteous will, And to the end endure.
Page 27 - Give to the winds thy fears ; Hope, and be undismayed; God hears thy sighs and counts thy tears, God shall lift up thy head. Through waves and clouds and storms He gently clears thy way; Wait thou His time, so shall this night Soon end in joyous day.
Page 234 - There is no fear in love ; but perfect love casteth out fear : because fear hath torment. He that feareth is not made perfect in love.

À propos de l'auteur (2007)

John R. Tyson is professor of church history and director of United Methodist Studies at Colgate Rochester Crozer Divinity School, Rochester, New York.

Informations bibliographiques