A treatise on the mineral waters of Harrogate and its vicinity

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1846
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Page 53 - ... to contain several hogsheads of water, and covered it with a large stone to preserve it from the sun and rain water ; and for a week together we rammed its sides with clay to prevent other springs from getting in. The event answered expectation: for we had a fresh spring of much better and stronger water, which afforded as much in one hour now as it did in twenty-four before, more loaded with the minerals than ever, and so of greater efficacy for either bathing or drinking.
Page 161 - ... repose from his apostolic labours; and such is the disposition of the human mind to place confidence in the operation of mysterious agents, that we find him more disposed to attribute his cure to a brown paper plaister of egg and brimstone, than to Dr. Fothergill's salutary prescription of country air, rest, asses
Page 140 - It speedily and safely carries off the effects of intemperance in those who, having spent the winter and spring in festivity, resort to Harrogate with their system loaded with impurities from the excesses of the table, and whose stomachs are debilitated by these and similar causes. Its use is acknowledged in those predisposed to apoplexy. In chlorosis it has been usual to drink the sulphur-water for some time, and then to take the chalybeate.
Page 156 - In the second, or immersion in warm water, the heat of the system is prevented from escaping, and has rather a tendency to accumulate — so that in fact the living body is, after coming out from this kind of bath, better prepared to resist cold than before.
Page 152 - I have seen them removed in one fourth part of the time in which they are commonly cured with us. In such cases I cannot sufficiently extol the advantages of the Turkish bath: the friction employed is half the cure, and the articulations of every bone in the body are so twisted and kneaded, that the most rigid joints are rendered pliant. I have trembled to see them dislocate the wrist and shoulder joints, and reduce them in a moment; their dexterity is astonishing, and Mohammed's shampooing, at Brighton,...
Page 152 - If the succession of our ideas be the real measure of life, the rapidity with which they then recur to the memory, and the vigour with which the mind runs over the extended chain of them, would induce a belief, that in the two hours of delicious calm that succeeds the bath, one has lived a number of years!
Page 152 - If life be nothing but the succession of our ideas, the rapidity with which they then recur to the memory, the vigour with which the mind runs over the extended chain of them, would induce a belief that, in the two hours of that delicious calm that succeeds the bath, one has lived a number of years.
Page 158 - ... in it from ten to fifteen minutes, and immediately on coming out of it went to bed, my bed having been well warmed, with a view to preventing my taking cold. Having pursued this method some time, and finding myself frequently feverish and restless after bathing, I accidentally in conversation mentioned the circumstance to an intelligent gentleman who happened to lodge in the house, and who had long been in a habit of visiting Harrowgate every year.
Page 91 - ... in an afternoon, when there was the greatest appearance of water-drinkers of all ranks I ever saw. I was not a little troubled at the capriciousness of the person who carried on the whole design to...
Page 149 - ... a free circulation to the air. A spacious estrade, or raised floor, covered with a carpet, and divided into compartments, goes round it, on which the bather leaves his clothes. In the middle of the building is a jet d'eau, which throws water from a basin, and agreeably entertains the eye.

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