A Concise Grammar of the Persian Language: Containing Dialogues, Reading Lessons, and a Vocabulary: Together with a New Plan for Facilitating the Study of Languages

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B. Quaritch, 1857 - 206 pages
 

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Page 22 - Youths which shall continue in their bloom for ever, shall go round about to attend them, with goblets, and beakers, and a cup of flowing wine...
Page 40 - ... in it the majesty of the Spanish, the vivacity of the French, the strength of the German, the sweetness of the Italian ; and, in addition, energetic conciseness in its imagery; with the richness of the Greek and Latin.] 1 This is said with reference to the other members of the Slavonic family.
Page 100 - On earth there is no gratitude, I trow ; Or none, perhaps, to use it now pretend. None learn of me the science of the bow, Who make me not their target in the end.
Page 120 - ... advantage, and but small fruition is derivable from the produce of good sense in the period of calamity; still, notwithstanding all this, it behoves a wise man in no way to despair of the benefits of wisdom, nor to allow of delay or tardiness in repelling the devices of an enemy. He then made himself appear dead, and went floating on the surface of the water. One of the fishermen picked him up, and fancying him to be dead, threw him on the ground; and he, craftily flinging himself into a rivulet,...
Page 96 - ... was his superior in strength. He fastened on him with that curious grip which he had kept concealed from him. The youth knew not how to foil it. The preceptor lifted him with both hands from the ground, and raised him above his head, and dashed him on the ground.
Page 108 - Hung graceful — and like mistress, smiling bland, Bending propitious to the lover's tale — To the young breeze roses their hues unveil. All at once, two or three fishermen happened to pass by that water, and by the will of God they discovered the circumstances of the abode of those three fishes in that lake, exactly as things really were. Having agreed therefore on a rendezvous with one another, they hastened to bring their nets, and the fishes, having gained intelligence of that circumstance,...
Page 110 - ... two or three fishermen happened to pass by that water, and by the will of God they discovered the circumstances of the abode of those three fishes in that lake, exactly as things really were. Having agreed therefore on a rendezvous with one another, they hastened to bring their nets, and the fishes, having gained intelligence of that circumstance, immersed as they were in water were, nevertheless, made to consort with the fire of anguish. When night drew on, the fish that was perfectly wise and...
Page 38 - Although the trouble of travel is wearing to the mind, still it enlivens by visiting new countries and seeing the wonders of the world ; and, moreover, when the disposition has become accustomed to the inconveniences of the journey, it is no longer harassed by them, and the toil of the road ceases to make the same impression on the spirits, in consequence of the interest taken in the wonders of the strange country. COUPLET. What matter though in travel's path the thorn of trouble grows ; Since from...
Page 94 - The great nobles and ministers of the king attended. The youth entered, like a furious elephant, with a shock that had his adversary been a mountain of iron would have uptorn it from its base. The master perceived that the young man was his superior in strength.
Page 24 - ... same, neither shall their reason be disturbed: and with fruits of the sorts which they shall choose, and the flesh of birds of the kind which they shall desire. And there shall accompany them fair damsels having large black eyes: resembling pearls hidden in their shells: as a reward for that which they shall have wrought. They shall not hear therein any vain discourse, or any charge of sin; but only the salutation, Peace! Peace!

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