The Printer's Complete Guide: Containing a Sketch of the History and Progress of Printing, to Its Present State of Improvement; Details of Its Several Departments; Numerous Schemes of Imposition; Modern Improvements in Stereotype, Presses, and Machinery, &c &c

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Sherwood, Gilbert, and Piper, 1825 - 96 pages
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Page 209 - Whoever thinks a faultless piece to see, Thinks what ne'er was, nor is, nor e'er shall be. In every work regard the writer's end, Since none can compass more than they intend ; And if the means be just, the conduct true, Applause, in spite of trivial faults, is due. As men of breeding, sometimes men of wit, T...
Page 245 - On the other hand, if this taking appear to be advantageous, and there should happen to be two or three of the companionship out of copy at the same time, a sort of scramble will take place who shall have it, which will end in dispute and confusion — on no account, therefore, should the copy be open to examination, unless for the purpose of ascertaining the charge per sheet. With manuscript copy it will be better to take one from the other in such a manner as not in the smallest degree to delay...
Page 263 - ... in a bearing piece, which slides in a groove formed in the rod, and is regulated by the screw. This shortening of the connecting rod produces a greater or less descent of the platen, when the handle is brought to the stop. The carriage of the press is represented with wheels, »im, beneath, to take off the friction of moving upon the ribs H.
Page 263 - Л, approaches the centre, and the perpendicular distance diminishes ; the bar or handle also comes to a more favourable position for the man to pull, because he draws nearly at right angles to its length. All these causes combined have the best...
Page 208 - A, which makes the printer's alphabet, consisting of twenty-three letters,* complete; provided that the body of the work begins with B. To ascertain more readily how many sheets a book consists of, more than are marked with signatures in capitals or small capitals, a lower case Roman a is put to the first sheet, and thus carried on till the beginning of the body of the work.
Page 249 - During the time any forms have remained under the care of the overseer, should there have been any alteration as to form or substance, such alterations not having been made by the original compositors, they are not subject to clear away those parts of the form that were altered. If the pressmen unlock a form on the press, and from carelessness in the locking up any part of it fall out, they are subject to the loss that may happen in consequence.
Page 245 - ... of the compositor. Taking Copy. If printed copy, and the compositor is desired to follow page for page, each sheet, as it is given out, should be divided into as many parts as the companionship may consist of, and the choice of each part, if it materially varies, should be thrown for. During the absence of either of the companionship, if he be likely soon to return, some one should throw for him, on condition that he will...
Page 246 - If any part of the matter for distribution, whether in chase or in paper, be desirable or otherwise, for the sorts it may contain, it should be divided equally, or the choice of it thrown for. When a new companion is put on the work after the respective shares of letter are made up, and if there be not a...
Page 238 - ... practice in printing. It is for this reason that correctors, in most printing-offices, are chosen out of compositors that are thought capable of that office, and who know how not only to correct literal faults, but can also discern where improprieties in workmanship are used, which cannot...
Page 195 - Germany, in the affairs of trade, had an opportunity of informing himself of the whole method and progress of the art, and by the encouragement of the great, and particularly of the Abbot of Westminster, first set up a press in that Abbey, and began to print books soon after the year 1471.

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