The Rise of Placental Mammals: Origins and Relationships of the Major Extant Clades

Couverture
Kenneth D. Rose, J. David Archibald
JHU Press, 29 mars 2005 - 259 pages
3 Avis

From shrews to blue whales, placental mammals are among the most diverse and successful vertebrates on the Earth. Arising sometime near the Late Cretaceous, this broad clade of mammals contains more than 1,000 genera and approximately 4,400 extant species. Although much studied, the origin and diversification of the placentals continue to be a source of debate.

Paleontologists Kenneth D. Rose and J. David Archibald have assembled the world's leading authorities to provide a comprehensive and up-to-date evolutionary history of placental mammals. Focusing on anatomical evidence, the contributors present an unbiased scientific account of the initial radiation and ordinal relationships of placental mammals, representing both the consensus and significant minority viewpoints. This book will be invaluable to paleontologists, evolutionary biologists, mammalogists, and students.

Contributors: J. David Archibald, San Diego State University; Robert J. Asher, Institut für Systematische Zoologie; Jonathan I. Bloch, University of Michigan; Douglas M. Boyer, University of Michigan; Daryl P. Domning, Howard University; Eduardo Eizirik, National Cancer Institute; Robert J. Emry, Smithsonian Institution; Jörg Erfurt, Martin-Luther-University; John J. Flynn, The Field Museum; Timothy J. Gaudin, University of Tennessee; Emmanuel Gheerbrant, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle; Philip D. Gingerich, The University of Michigan; Patricia A. Holroyd, University of California, Berkeley; J. J. Hooker, The Natural History Museum; Léo F. Laporte, University of California, Santa Cruz; Jin Meng, American Museum of Natural History;William J. Murphy, National Cancer Institute; Jason C. Mussell, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Michael J. Novacek, American Museum of Natural History; Stephen J. O'Brien, National Cancer Institute; Kenneth D. Rose, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine; Guillermo W. Rougier, University of Louisville; Eric J. Sargis, Yale University; Mary T. Silcox, University of Winnipeg; Nancy B. Simmons, American Museum of Natural History; Mark S. Springer, University of California, Riverside; Gerhard Storch, Forschungsinstitut Senckenberg; Pascal Tassy, Muséum National d'Histoire Naturelle; Jessica M. Theodor, Illinois State Museum; Gina D. Wesley, The University of Chicago; John R. Wible, Carnegie Museum of Natural History; André Wyss, University of California, Santa Barbara.

 

Avis des internautes - Rédiger un commentaire

Aucun commentaire n'a été trouvé aux emplacements habituels.

Table des matières

ANATO MICAL EVIDENCE
15
MOLECULAR EVIDENCE FOR 10 GLIRES LAGOMORPHA
37
NSECTIVORANGRADE Nancy B Simmons
50
MACROSCELIDEA
70
XENARTHRA AND PHOLID OTA
106
EUARCHONTA DERMOPTERA
127
Droits d'auteur

Expressions et termes fréquents

Références à ce livre

À propos de l'auteur (2005)

Kenneth D. Rose is a professor at the Center for Functional Anatomy and Evolution at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine and a research associate at the Smithsonian National Museum of Natural History in Washington, D.C., and the Carnegie Museum of Natural History in Pittsburgh. J. David Archibald is Professor of Biology and Curator of Mammals in the Department of Biology at San Diego State University. In addition he is a Research Associate at the San Diego Museum of Natural History and the University of California Museum of Paleontology, Berkeley. For the past 10 years he has directed the URBAC Paleontological Expeditions to the Kyzylkum Desert, Uzbekistan, where he and his colleagues search for early placental mammals.

Informations bibliographiques