Elements of Logic

Couverture
E. H. Butler & Company, 1858 - 263 pages
 

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Page 219 - He that despised Moses' law died without mercy under two or three witnesses : of how much sorer punishment suppose ye, shall he be thought worthy, who hath trodden under foot the Son of God, and hath counted the blood of the covenant, wherewith he was sanctified, an unholy thing, and hath done despite unto the Spirit of grace...
Page 187 - When the mariner has been tossed for many days in thick weather, and on an unknown sea, he naturally avails himself of the first pause in the storm, the earliest glance of the sun, to take his latitude, and ascertain how far the elements have driven him from his true course. Let us imitate this prudence, and, before we float farther on the waves of this debate, refer to the point from which we departed, that we may at least be able to conjecture where we now are. I ask for the reading of the resolution...
Page 134 - ... 2. None but Whites are civilized : the ancient Germans were Whites : therefore they were civilized. 3. None but Whites are civilized : the Hindoos are not Whites : therefore they are not civilized. 4. None but civilized people are Whites : the Gauls were Whites : therefore they were civilized. 5. No one is rich who has not enough : no miser has enough : therefore no miser is rich. 6. If penal laws against Papists were enforced, they would be aggrieved : but penal laws against them are not enforced...
Page 187 - Mr. President, when the mariner has been tossed, for many days, in thick weather, and on an unknown sea, he naturally avails himself of the first pause in the storm, the earliest glance of the sun, to take his latitude, and ascertain how far the elements have driven him from his true course. Let us imitate this prudence; and before we float further, on the waves of this debate, refer to the point from which we departed, that we may, at least, be able to form some conjecture where we now are. I ask...
Page 218 - This is a very open and familiar illustration, but serves to indicate the dangers to which it is liable. Almost all the processes of discovery in natural religion are by means of the reasoning d posteriori. Argument d fortiori. — This is a method by which we establish a stronger conclusion even than ordinary premisses need to warrant us. Thus, A is greater than B. B is greater than C. A is greater than C. That this conclusion is just there can. be no doubt ; and that the form of it is not exactly...
Page 174 - ... which involves a fallacy of illicit process. Thus, XY Maj. prem. All responsible beings are accountable. ZX Min. prem. Brutes are not responsible beings. ZY Therefore Brutes are not accountable. All X is Y, No Z is X, No Z is Y. In which Y, which is distributed in the conclusion, — being the predicate of a negative proposition, — is undistributed in the major premiss : an illicit process of the major term. It will be observed in this latter instance, that the conclusion is, we believe, a...

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