Pope et Voltaire: "An essay on man" (1734), "Discours en vers sur l'homme" (1734-1737)

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typis F. G. Kvnike, 1875 - 56 pages

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Page 47 - In Faith and Hope the world will disagree, . But all Mankind's concern is Charity : All must be false, that thwart this one great End : And all of God, that bless Mankind or mend. Man, like the gen'rous vine, supported lives ; The strength he gains is from th
Page 28 - God loves from whole to parts : but human soul Must rise from individual to the whole. Self-love but serves the virtuous mind to wake, As the small pebble stirs the peaceful lake ; The centre moved, a circle straight succeeds, Another still, and still another spreads ; Friend, parent, neighbour, first it will embrace; His country next, and next all human race...
Page 35 - replies a pamper'd goose : And just as short of reason he must fall, Who thinks all made for one, not one for all.
Page 28 - Two principles in human nature reign; Self-love, to urge, and reason, to restrain; Nor this a good, nor that a bad we call, Each works its end, to move or govern all: And to their proper operation still Ascribe all good; to their improper, ill.
Page 34 - Is it for thee the lark ascends and sings? Joy tunes his voice, joy elevates his wings. Is it for thee the linnet pours his throat ? Loves of his own and raptures swell the note.
Page 22 - Fix'd like a plant on his peculiar spot, To draw nutrition, propagate, and rot: Or, meteor-like, flame lawless through the void, Destroying others, by himself destroy'd.
Page 48 - Here fix'd the dreadful, there the blest abodes: Fear made her devils, and weak hope her gods; Gods partial, changeful, passionate, unjust, Whose attributes were rage, revenge, or lust; Such as the souls of cowards might conceive, And, form'd like tyrants, tyrants would believe.
Page 36 - What would this man? now upward will he soar, And little less than angel, would be more; Now looking downwards, just as griev'd appears To want the strength of bulls, the fur of bears.
Page 17 - OH happiness ! our being's end and aim ! Good, pleasure, ease, content ? whate'er thy name : That something still which prompts th' eternal sigh, For which we bear to live, or dare to die, Which still so near us, yet beyond us lies, O'er-look'd, seen double, by the fool, and wise.
Page 33 - Created half to rise, and half to fall; Great lord of all things, yet a prey to all; Sole judge of truth, in endless error hurl'd; The glory, jest, and riddle of the world!

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